Drip-drop nature painting in preschool

by Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. on May 5, 2013

in Creative Art, Nature Color Hunt, Nature Drip-Drop Painting, Painting, Science and Nature

It is so exciting to see new growth coming up all around our preschool. Along with new growth came an invitation to spend our morning hunting for different colors of nature and creating our own drip-drop nature paintings…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

When the children came to preschool, they found paint swatches and empty paper plates all set up on the table and ready for questions and discussion about what these could possibly be for…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Mrs. Courtney took the time to mix up paint colors that matched each of our paint color swatches. The paint colors looked so lovely that the children couldn’t wait to explore all of the wonderful colors but first we had to go outside and gather up items from nature…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

We took all of our paper plates out and invited the children to see if they could find items from nature that would match each color on our paper plates…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Mrs. Courtney began by taking the children on a nature walk through our woods and while on their walk, they talked about what colors they could see all around them and began collecting some items for our collection…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

When the children returned from their nature walk through the woods, they began the process of sorting items from their nature walk on our paper plates…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

There were still many colors missing so the children continued to search for more colors of nature until we were able to find at least a few things for each color on our paper plates…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Once we had a good collection of nature colors on our paper plates, we took the plates inside to compare the items we had collected. We compared which color had the most items and which had the least. For the color orange, we didn’t find anything at all but no worries because one of our students happened to have an orange shoe which gave us the opportunity to compare nature and non-nature for a few minutes…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

After a morning of hunting the colors of nature, we used the items we found to explore the process of drip-drop painting. The children began by selecting nature items from our paper plates to arrange on their own cardboard palette…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Once the children had arranged the items they wanted on their cardboard palette, they began dripping spoonfuls of paint on top of the items they selected.  (The paint has glue mixed in with each color so when the paint dries, the nature items will stick to the cardboard palette or the paint)…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

The children were free to add as many items as they wished onto their paintings. Some of the children used a little bit of every color and a selection of every color of nature items we had collected while others chose just one or two items to drip paint on….

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

This little guy only wanted one rock and one small flower on his cardboard palette…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Although he chose only two items from nature, he spent the longest of everyone painting his palette until every single space on the palette had color…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Whether a child used lots of paint or very little and lots of nature items or very few, the results of their nature palettes were astounding which I am excited to share with you…

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Drip-Drop Nature Painting by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

Head outdoors for a listening walk by Teach Preschool

Take a picture walk by Teach Preschool

Nature Shadow Boxes by Teach Preschool

This article is being shared with you by Deborah Stewart of Teach Preschool - Promoting excellence in early childhood education at home and in the preschool classroom!

Check out Deborah's new book and order your copy today!

-Teach Preschool on Pinterest
-Teach Preschool on Facebook
-Teach Preschool on Twitter
-Deborah Stewart on Google+ or Teach Preschool G+ Page

Teach Preschool Button or Logo

Subscribe to receive the latest Teach Preschool blog posts by email...

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Disclosure: Teach Preschool is a participating member in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program

Comments on this entry are closed.

1 Pam May 5, 2013 at 6:21 pm

I have a confession: I love dandelions! They are the toughest flower in existence, look at all the effort put out to destroy them and still they come back, like little drops of sunlight on the lawn. Sadly I am married to a dandelion hater :(
Oh and as for the post, an excellent idea, I will have to figure out how to incorporate it in our program, without decimating the church’s flower garden.

2 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 5, 2013 at 6:46 pm

Haha – bring in a bunch of those dandelions!! I love dandelions too – especially for preschool. We had a patch of yard covered with dandelions but I told my hubby to NOT mow them down until after our week in preschool. We needed them everyday:) We had so many – it was really quite beautiful!

3 Pam May 5, 2013 at 6:57 pm

We actually have acres of dandelions right now, I see bright shots of yellow, he sees noxious weeds. (It is apparently a mixed marriage). The first time our now 26 year old son mowed the lawn I gave him strict instructions on how to do it, including mow around all of the dandelions. Then I went into the house and let him do it, but I peeked out of a window to make sure he did it safely. He came to his first patch of dandelions and stopped. As I watched he looked around to see if anyone was looking, then with a big smile on his face, he ran right over those innocent little flowers. He was only eleven, but had already gone over to the dark side.
Years ago I did a painting project with my daughter, where she used the dandelion as her brush.

4 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 5, 2013 at 8:22 pm

Hahahaha! Boys!!

5 Faigie May 5, 2013 at 10:08 pm

What a cool project. Did you give thought beforehand to the colors you prepared? Did you only use colors that you knew the kids would be able to match up?

6 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 6, 2013 at 9:07 pm

When I was selecting cards for this activity, I purposely looked for colors that might be available in and around our woods. We did pretty good but not all colors were available in the end :)

7 Jennifer | The Deliberate Mom May 6, 2013 at 3:30 pm

Such lovely ideas! I love the colours and the photos of the children engaged in this activity are delightful.

Beautiful work!

8 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 6, 2013 at 9:07 pm

Thank you:) It was a really wonderful process.

9 MIRIAM FERNANDEZ BORASO May 7, 2013 at 8:27 pm

awesome activity! thanks for sharing! I defenitely will put it into practise! a question: can I do it with larger groups?
hugs & love
MIRIAM

10 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 8, 2013 at 6:49 am

Hi Miriam,
I think this process would work well with larger groups as it is very open ended and can easily be modified as needed to fit the needs of your classroom.

11 Naghmeh May 19, 2013 at 6:46 pm

Hi Dear teacher,
thanks for sharing these exciting experiments.
Would u please write more about mixing glue and paint? what kind of glue and what kind of paint should we use?

12 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 19, 2013 at 8:24 pm

Hello Naghmeh,
We use white elmers glue or in some places it is called PVA glue. It is a basic white glue commonly used by most children in a school setting. And we used liquid tempera paint. Mix a tablespoon of glue with one cup (or less) of paint.

13 Precious May 20, 2013 at 11:16 am

Great idea! I was wondering if you had used poster board for this activity or white cardboard or? It looks sturdy enough to stand up to all the paint :)

14 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. May 20, 2013 at 3:35 pm

We used corrugated cardboard. I cut it up into small pieces so each child would have a piece of their own to hold and paint on.

15 Ashley May 25, 2013 at 8:46 pm

What a fabulously fun idea! I am going to do this for our next nature walk. Thank you for sharing.

PS. I love your blog and following you on Pinterest!

Ashley

16 Nova August 11, 2013 at 5:09 am

Wow. This activity was awesome. I would love to do this activity too but unfortunately were far from woods. :( but I really loved the ideas. :)

{ 2 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post:

wordpress stat