The weather helper in preschool

Every morning after the children come to preschool, we settle into our morning group time and talk about the weather. It’s been interesting how much learning, growth, and development I have seen stem from this simple process of documenting and talking about the weather.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Miss Abby and I both take similar approaches to documenting the weather each day. Miss Abby has the younger students while I work with the PreK students so you will see from the photos that the children are at various stages of development in their ability to draw symbols, hold a writing tool, and share their ideas with us.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Each day, our weather helper of the day is asked to draw their weather picture on our small clip board.  Some of our students begin the year with lots of “scribbles” but to the child, every scribble has a story to tell.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Sometimes, the child goes over to the window to draw on his or her weather chart. We find going to the window and touching the window helps the children to recognize what the weather is like that day more fully (cold, hot, sunny, cloudy, and so on). Going to the window also inspires more conversation and we can ask questions like “What do you see?” “How does the window feel to your hand?” “Did you need a coat on today?” And so on…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

And some children may already know what they want to draw so they stay in the helper chair and get to work…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

We then ask the children to tell us about their drawing and they will tell us things like “It is cloudy” or “It is sunny and rainy.”  There is no right or wrong answer and we don’t challenge their weather stories, we simply document the words that the children use on their paper.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

And then we share and sing about the weather with the whole group using some of the weather words the child has chosen to share with us that day. One of the greatest things about all of this is that I have never had the children question or be critical about each other’s drawings. The children seem to accept their difference in drawing styles easily. Now they may challenge each other on what the weather is like. One child may say it is sunny and warm when there is snow on the ground and the others will challenge this but the children still stay more focused on discussing the weather. Of course, we as teachers also treat each drawing as it is a prize possession because each one really is.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

After singing about our weather, we place the weather chart on our weather board so we can continue with our weather pattern throughout the week. On some days, we go back and review the weather and on other days, we move on to our next thing. It all depends on where the conversation leads us and the interests of the children.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

As the year progresses, we begin seeing changes in the children’s drawings. Lines for raindrops often start to show up…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

And circles with lines for sunshines start to be added to their drawings…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

The drawings gradually become less scribble and more defined…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

And by the end of the year, many of our older students are turning their weather chart into full weather stories with people and symbols. The children will begin to tell us stories such as “It’s sunny and cloudy and this is me and my friends playing outside.”…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

We print the weather words that the children give us on the weather chart and sometimes will even print out the full story. We always add the child’s initials and date the document as well. All weather charts are saved and put into the child’s portfolio to give parents at the end of the school year. It is a wonderful collection of drawings that are meaningful and demonstrate progress, understanding, and skills throughout the school year…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

I posted a brief note about the weather helper on my Instagram awhile back and one of the comments was that her student’s wouldn’t be able to sit still and wait for the child to draw the weather. So I thought I would also share how we manage this process.

  • First, it is important to note that we do not have a long, set routine of other things we do in the morning circle. Our weather is the most important part of our morning routine and then we move onto our story and other activities for the day.
  • Second, on some days, this process goes by very quickly – only taking a couple of minutes – and on other days, it can take longer (especially as the children get older).
  • Third, I’ve been doing this for four years now and every year it just keeps getting more intriguing to me. I started out making it a quick routine but over time, I realized that it had the potential to be so much more so we always take our time to really explore, talk about, and investigate the weather through this process.
  • Fouth, I find that as the children document their weather symbols and stories, they become more interested in the weather and the process is so much more meaningful. I will never use a preprinted weather symbol again – not because it is wrong to do so – but because once you fully embrace a process similar to this and see the results, it’s a game-changer on what works the best.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Finally, as the children become more interested in this process and want to draw more elaborate weather stories, I have had to come up with a few short routines we can do to keep the children from getting bored while we wait. Some days we need these routines and other days we don’t. We do things like pass around our letter board for the children to talk about and trace with their finger…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Or we use the time to have conversations about other things we are or will be exploring that week…

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

And there are some days when the weather is so interesting, we all just stop and join our helper at the window and everyone discusses the weather together while our helper continues to draw.

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

I hope I haven’t lost you on this rather lengthy post but I wanted to do my own documenting of our weather helper process as it is a process I have really grown to love and believe in. I’ve seen children feel so accomplished, build confidence, and build new skills with this short morning routine and it just gets me all excited!

The Weather Helper by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

What will the weather be today? by Teach Preschool

Graphing the Weather by Teach Preschool

Weather Word Wall Art by Teach Preschool

Cloud in a Jar by Teach Preschool

Exploring Raindrops and Clouds by Teach Preschool

By | April 2nd, 2016|Categories: Circle Time, Drawing|Tags: , , |19 Comments

Raindrop graphing on the flannel board

The flannel board is such a great teaching tool when you think outside the box a bit. This week, we turned the flannel board into a raindrop measuring graph!

Raindrop Measuring Graph by Teach Preschool

With all the rain this month, it has been a good opportunity to dive into a little rain science and math. The children were each given a small measuring bottle then invited to predict how much rain their cup would get in it if left outside for the morning.

Raindrop Measuring Graph by Teach Preschool

Most of the children predicted that they would get up to the number five line. One parent mentioned that it could be that the children chose four or five because many of the children are now age four and five. I thought that was a pretty good observation.

Raindrop Measuring Graph by Teach Preschool

After their predictions, the children placed their bottles outside in the rain and left them for the school day. Later in the day, the children got their bottles and checked out the actual measurement.

Raindrop Measuring Graph by Teach Preschool

As you can see, there wasn’t quite as much rain in their bottles as they had predicted. I was a little disappointed that we didn’t get much rain that day. I think we should do a do-over the next time our weather person says it is going to be another rainy day!

Raindrop Measuring Graph by Teach Preschool

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Links to Grow On

The Rain Jar by Teach Preschool

Painting with the Rain by The Nurture Store

Rainstick in a bottle

Tis the season of lots of rain and with all that rain, we were inspired to make our own rainstick in a bottle…

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Miss Lauren came up with this brilliant and simple idea for the children to make. She wanted the children to explore the weather with all their senses and the rainstick in a bottle invited the children to listen to the ‘rain’ and to look at the ‘rain’ as it flowed through their ‘clouds’.

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

I love the rainstick in a bottle because it includes time in sensory play, as well as invites creativity along with further discussion about the weather.

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Miss Lauren saved up plastic bottles for the children to use. I think the bottles were Sparkling Water bottles but I am not for sure. To make the rainstick in a bottle, the children began by filling their bottles with cotton ball clouds. It is better to not pack the bottle full of cotton balls but to fill it lightly so that the rain can trickle down to the bottle of the bottle.

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Once the children added their clouds, they were ready to add the rain. The children could use the funnel to add rain to their bottles or just use their hands and sprinkle the rain right over the rice tub.

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Miss Lauren added colored rice for the rain. She placed the rice in a baggie with blue liquid watercolor then kneaded the bag till all the rice turned the desired color of blue. Then she spread the rice out on a tray and left it to dry overnight.

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

As you can see, not every child followed the order that I described above when making their rainsticks in a bottle but it didn’t really matter…

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

All that mattered was adding a little of both cotton and rice. We didn’t worry about amounts as the children could test it out to see if they liked the amounts they added to their bottle. If not, just pour some out and start again!

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Once the bottle had the desired amount of clouds and rain, its time to put on the lid and watch the rain flow through the clouds as they turned the bottle slowly up then down…

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Oh, and don’t forget to add your name!

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

The rainstick in a bottle center remained open through out the morning so the children would have plenty of time to create their rainstick…

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

This was an activity that the children enjoyed exploring and it was fun watching them enjoy the process!

Rainstick in a bottle by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

Exploring Raindrops and Clouds by Teach Preschool

Rainy Day Drawing Cube on Preschool Spot!

For more great spring idea see Spring on Pinterest – click here!

By | March 16th, 2016|Categories: Discovery Bottles, DIY, Science and Nature|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather in preschool

The month of March roared in like a lion and has continued to be crazy weather ever since. This crazy weather system gives us the perfect opportunity to talk about the different kinds of weather all month long…

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

We started our month off by making roaring lions to symbolize the roar of the wind we were hearing, feeling, and seeing outside…

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

Our Scholastic Magazine was a perfect addition to our weather discussion as well!

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

We discussed how the weather was sometimes loud and sometimes quiet.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

To make our first day of March absolutely outstanding, the weather was all over the map. During our morning circletime, it was very windy, then it started to rain, and then it began to hail! We stopped to watch the hail drop down on the rooftop.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

We wanted to take a closer look so we threw on our coats to head outside but by the time we got outside, the hail had stopped. Still, we were able to find lots of hail around the building and we collected some hail for further observation and discussion…

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

The hail was cold on our hands and it felt like little ice marbles…

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

We managed to gather a good collection of hail and then we did a little rain walking before heading back inside.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

Later in the week, it got even colder and snowed.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

And of course we went outside to explore the snow. There was just enough snow on the ground to build a snow deer with stick antlers…

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

And then last week, it was absolutely beautiful outside! Sunny and warm and once again, we went outside to enjoy the beautiful day. Only this time, we didn’t need our coats on.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

Yes, March has definitely come in roaring like a lion. Who knows what the weather will be like next week. I have heard reports that more cold weather is on its way.

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

Whatever the weather will be, you can bet that we will get outside and explore it!

March roars in like a lion: Talking about weather by Teach Preschool

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Links to Grow on!

Rain Paint by Learn Play Imagine

Clouds in a Jar by Teach Preschool

To see more Ideas for Weather on Pinterest Click here!

By | March 13th, 2016|Categories: Outdoor Play, Science and Nature|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

Cotton ball clouds

We recently spent a few days exploring different types of weather.  We also focused a great deal on raindrops and clouds.  This simple activity that I would like to share with you today sparked some great use of vocabulary and imagination…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

To begin our discussion on clouds, we read the book “It Looked Like Spilt Milk” by Charles Shaw…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

This is a classic picture book that perhaps many of you have used in your own classrooms before.  The narrator describes the different things he sometimes sees when he looks at the clouds, like rabbits and birds.  The children guessed long before the end of the book that each of the illustrations were clouds but the author waits until the last page to reveal that these were indeed all clouds…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

The reason I love this book so much is that there are so many different directions you could go with this book.  Today I’m going to share a little game we played and then an art activity to go along with it…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

Deborah began our circletime game by taking out the large felt board.  On it, she placed puffy shapes that she had cut out of white felt.  Deborah pointed to a shape and then asked the children what they thought the shape looked like.  They all shouted out their answers at the same time…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

There were no rules or right or wrong answers in this game.  The children were simply free to use their imaginations.  After our short felt board game, Deborah passed cotton balls around the circle.  Each child took one and held on to it as Deborah showed them how to pull and stretch it to make a fluffy cotton ball cloud…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

After the demonstration, the children took their cotton balls and went to the art table.  There they found black paper and glue.  We challenged the children to create a new picture or shape out of their cotton balls…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

Once they had a nice puddle of glue on their paper, the children worked and stretched their cotton balls into a fluffy cloud.  Then they placed them on their paper and manipulated them into the shape that they desired…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

When all of the children were finished, those that wished to share showed their clouds to the class…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

Again, we all shouted out our guesses as to what we thought those clouds might be.  Some were monsters, blobs, caterpillars, and circles…

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

Cotton ball clouds by Teach Preschool

But more than anything, I think these fluffy little cotton ball clouds were a wonderful way for children to use their imaginations…

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

Clouds in Jars and On the Table Top Too!

Exploring Raindrops and Clouds in Preschool

Disappearing Clouds

By | March 1st, 2014|Categories: Children's Books|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Who cares about the weather?

In just one short week of preschool, we had all kinds of weather from very cold and icy to a wonderfully warm day filled with rain and thunderstorms then right back to cold weather again…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

With so many types of weather it was a good week to promote lots of conversations and explorations about the weather in our classroom. We started our days by reading all kinds of books about the weather that promote conversation like this big book (that I have had for years) titled “Who Cares about the Weather?”…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

We discovered that people need warm weather for sailing in the ocean or playing at the beach and cold weather is fun for things like skiing or ice skating. We also discovered that farmers need rainy weather for their crops…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

We discovered that there are so many reasons the weather is important for plants, animals, and people too. And because the winter Olympics are currently going on, we especially noticed how the weather was important because without snow and ice, the athletes wouldn’t be able to compete for a medal…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Talking about the weather and reading books about the weather led us to many different things throughout the week including the winter Olympics…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

One of our little girls wore her homemade Olympic crown to school and of course we all had to make one too!

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Our crowns were just a little different but the children loved using our gold and silver glitter paint to glue on leaves and decorate their crowns…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Talking about the weather led to talking about the winter Olympics which led one of our students to also bring in a pair of skis for the children to check out…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Everyone took a turn to try on the snow skis to “ski” across our red winter carpet!  One tip from our experienced little skier was that it is important not to let your skis crisscross or you will fall over…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Keeping our skis straight was a big challenge but the children did a remarkable job and everyone loved getting a chance to try the skis out and once again, we learned that skiers care about the weather and to really ski, we would need real snow…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Our adventure in weather went on all throughout the week but one thing that I made sure we did was gather up as many icicles as we could before the warm-up set in and they would all melt. Good thing too because the day after we explored our icicles, the temperature jumped up and all the remaining icicles that were outside hanging from around the school all melted away…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

We had big icicles and little icicles to explore. We held the smaller icicles in our hands to see if we could use our warm hands to make the icicles melt and drip water…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

The very big icicles (which are rare for us to find) were too big to hold so we explored them in a tub…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

The children thought it would be fun to see what would happen if we painted the big icicles. Some of the children guessed it would make the icicles melt but instead, our paint just dripped right over the top and down into the tub leaving us with muddy looking and very cold icicle water…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

And of course, everyday we went outdoors to experience the weather too. One of our favorite things to do is to climb our snow mountain (which is now slowly starting to melt)…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

Of course, our weather may be different than your weather but regardless of the type of weather you are experiencing where you live, giving students a chance to explore the weather through real and meaningful hands on explorations and drawing connections to events such as the winter Olympics or vacations the children have been on is always a great learning experience…

Exploring the weather in preschool by Teach Preschool

We spent time creating and exploring the weather all week. Some of our experiences were more abstract and some were more real but all of them were fun and engaging.  More about the weather coming to you soon!

Available on Amazon

Who Cares About the Weather (Macmillan Early Science Big Books)

By | February 21st, 2014|Categories: Science and Nature|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

What will the weather be today? Our morning weather routine

With so many different kinds of weather since the start of our school year, we have been able to really take notice of the weather changes as we ask (sing) the question “What will the weather be today?”…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

During our morning circle, we take a few minutes everyday to talk about the weather. One child is chosen to be the weather helper and begins by looking outside so to tell us what he or she thinks the weather seems to be that day…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

Usually, the child chooses two words such as sunny and warm. One word that describes how the weather feels (temperature) and one word to tell us what they see (a weather symbol such as a sunshine, clouds etc….)

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

As the weather person is deciding, the entire class generally is also shouting out their own ideas of what the weather is so there is quite a bit of negotiating going on in the process by the entire class…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

Once the weather person has decided on what the weather will be, then the teacher writes the weather words on a blank square of paper and the child draws a weather symbol to represent the weather that day. Last year, I used pre-made weather symbols but this year, I decided to have the children draw their own weather symbols and they do a remarkable job.  All the children (ages three to five) figure out a way to somehow express what the weather is like in their simple drawings…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

We keep the paper ready to go on a small clip board for our weather person to draw on and the children take a quick minute to draw the weather while we wait and continue talking about the weather. If the weather person wishes to go off to the table and come back, they are welcome to do so but most of the children just sit right down on the floor and give it a go…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

After the weather is illustrated on paper then we staple it up on our weather board in one of the blank weather pattern squares…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

One thing I have noticed is that when the children are choosing the temperature of the weather, they will often say “cold” even if it is hot outside or “warm” even if it is cold outside.  I realized that the children were struggling with differentiating between what it feels to them inside the classroom versus what it felt like to them outside of the classroom…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

So when needed, we will have the weather person stand right outside the classroom door to check the weather and give us a more accurate idea of what the temperature feels like outside…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

As we staple the weather symbol to the board we sing this simple song “Weather, weather, weather, weather, what will the weather be today?”  “Sunny and cold, sunny and cold, that’s what the weather will be today.” And then we take a quick look to see if any weather pattern is emerging across our board…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

Once our board gets all the way full, we usually take down the current symbols and save them in our weather box and then start all over again adding a new set of weather symbols one day at a time…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

This entire process from looking out the window, drawing our weather symbols, singing our song, taking a quick look at the weather patterns is a non-stop and quick process…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

It takes us about five minutes (depending on the day) to go from the beginning to the end and it isn’t a sit-still-and-listen process, it is an interactive and inviting process. Everyone likes to join in and each child has gotten to know the routine very well…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

I think my favorite part of this process is not only the chance to talk about the weather but watching the children progress in making more complex weather symbols over time.  Remember, there is no right or wrong in the drawings. If a child scribbles a few dots and tells me it is rainy, then that is what I write and all of the children have naturally followed my lead. We have a saying in our classroom that goes something like this, “Your work (or drawing or painting) doesn’t have to be just like mine or anyone elses. It should be what you would like it to be.” I think the kids know this saying by heart…

What will the weather be?  by Teach Preschool

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By | January 11th, 2014|Categories: Circle Time|Tags: , |10 Comments

All four seasons at the sticky table

We have been experiencing what seems like all four seasons in one month! The weather has gone from a few warm sunny days to a few days with with blizzard like conditions to days with lots of rain or very strong winds.  With all this crazy weather, it has been a good time of year to explore the weather of all four seasons…

All Four Seasons at the Sticky Table by Teach Preschool

To get us thinking about the four seasons, we read “My Favorite Time of Year” by Susan Pearson.  I have had this book a very long time and although this book does a nice job illustrating all four seasons, it is a little on the long side as far as the story goes – so we did a little reading and picture surfing through the book…

Four seasons at the sticky table by Teach Preschool

After reading our book, we extended our study of the four seasons in several of our centers and one of the centers was our four seasons sticky table…

All four seasons at the sticky table by Teach Preschool

To create the sticky table, just add clear contact paper (sticky side up) to the top of a table or large tray. I used clear packing tape to hold the sticky paper in place…

All four seasons at the sticky table by Teach Preschool

For this sticky table, we set out foam squares and foam trees for the children to create all four seasons.  Our colors were divided into cups as follows…

  • Red/Yellow/Orange for fall
  • White for winter
  • Pink/Purple for spring
  • Green for summer

Of course, the center was left open ended so the children could choose how they preferred to use or combine the colors…

All four seasons at the sticky table by Teach Preschool

The foam shapes are easily removed from the sticky table so each child could put their shapes away when done, start over, or change up their designs…

Four Seasons at the Sticky Table by Teach Preschool

Lots of ways to explore the sticky table…

All four seasons at the sticky table by Teach Preschool

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By | March 20th, 2013|Categories: Four Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , |4 Comments

A few minutes outdoors on a cold winter day helps keep the winter blues away

I don’t know if it has been as cold where you live, but it has been super cold here. The problem with super cold weather is that it is tempting to just want to keep the kids indoors all day long. The process of helping a group of young children put on all those coats and hats and gloves and boots (depending on how cold it really is) can be a daunting task but in the end, a few minutes outdoors on a cold winter day does help to keep the winter blues away…

Outdoor Play by Teach Preschool

Since the beginning of the school year, we have been working with our students on how to put on their own coats. Most of my students (ages 3 to 5) can now put on their own coats, some of the children can zip up their own zippers, and a few can put on their own gloves.  I am glad we started early on the “coat management process” because it makes the “getting ready to go outside” run a little more smoothly…

Outdoor Play by Teach Preschool

However, if we hadn’t worked on putting on our own coats before now, winter time has a way of helping us make this a priority. I find that by taking the extra time needed to sit down with the children and go step by step on how to put on a coat to be a wonderful use of our time and a great skill for my students to master…

Outdoor Play by Teach Preschool

Even if we only take a quick walk outside or go for a run in our log maze and come right back in, the process of putting on coats and taking them off is an important life skill to spend time on and the time outdoors makes my students feel energized and happy…

Outdoor Play by Teach Preschool

The onset of winter weather also brings new outdoor experiences to explore. For example, we had lots of rain one week then over night the temperature dropped dramatically and every thing froze. On the rainy days, we were able to get outdoors and do a little puddle stomping and writing…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

When the temperature dropped, our trails were now covered with a thin layer of ice.  The children loved crunching up all the ice with their boots and even tried a little “ice skating”…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

And whenever we go outdoors during the winter, the children always find something they want to bring back inside to investigate a little further…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

So we try to find a way to extend our outdoor play by bringing some of our findings back inside like the sheets of ice the children found and collected on the icy trails…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

Our short walk on the icy trails, the collection of ice, and the indoor exploration of the ice led to the rest of our morning together engaged in winter time exploration…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

There are many reasons to take a few minutes and get outdoors during the cold days of winter that far outweigh all the excuses we drum up to stay indoors. I say this to you as much as to myself because I can tend to dread the cold weather but whenever I am in the middle of putting coats on and interacting with my students outdoors, I am reminded how important this time is and suddenly, I don’t feel so terribly cold after all…

Outdoors on a Cold Winter Day by Teach Preschool

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By | January 24th, 2013|Categories: Outdoor Play|Tags: , , , , , |20 Comments

Creating a rain jar

I have already shared the cloud jars we explored a few weeks ago and this time, the children explored a rain jar.  My assistant, Miss Abby, was in charge of our class for a day while I was off to a conference in Alabama and thankfully, Miss Abby took lots of photos of the activities the children did while I was away.  Miss Abby is such a great partner in the classroom!

Miss Abby put together a rain jar by placing a thick layer of paper towels over a jar and added a rubberband to hold the paper towel in place….

Then the children took turns adding drops of blue water to the top of the paper towel. The children watched as the water absorbed into the paper towel but didn’t immediately drop into the jar…

Once the paper towel begins to get heavy from absorbing too much water, the water begins to drip through the paper towel into the jar…

The children discovered that the paper towel turns darker blue as it absorbs up all the water. This entire activity was used as a follow up to the children’s book, “Cloudette” by Tom Lichtenheld. Miss Abby chose this activity to help demonstrate how a cloud holds the water until it finally releases it in the form of rain onto the ground..

A super simple way to demonstrate clouds and rain for young children! Well done Miss Abby!


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By | April 19th, 2012|Categories: Science and Nature|Tags: , , |9 Comments