Holiday window tracing

One of the things I love about the holiday season are all the symbols of the holidays. We spent time tracing many different holiday symbols with the help of the lighting from our big windows…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

Around the classroom, we have lots of windows which is wonderful for letting in natural light but it also means we don’t have much wall space. So to use the windows as part of our learning environment, we created a set of holiday symbols by printing simple shapes on sheets of overhead projector film…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

Another wonderful aspect of holiday symbols is that you can make many of them with the use of very basic shapes like squares, triangles, stars, and rectangles which gives us lots of opportunities to recognize and talk about the basic shapes that work together to form each of our holiday symbols…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

The shapes were taped up to our windows for the children to stop by throughout the day and trace. We set out thin paper and markers for the children to use as they wished…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

The children were invited to explore the tracing process in several ways. One way was to simply trace a shape and another way was to overlap the shapes as they tried tracing to see what the result might be…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

The children were welcomed to tape their paper over the drawings but most of the children preferred to hold their paper with one hand while tracing with another which can be very challenging to do…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

For those who wished to paint their tracings, we set out watercolor paints for the children to use…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

Some of the children decided to give the water paints a go while others were satisfied just with the tracing process…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

Of course, window tracings can be done all throughout the school year and do not have to be just holiday shapes so don’t get stuck on the idea that this idea should be only a holiday idea. Any kind of simple shapes you tape up into a window will be interesting to the children…

Holiday Window Tracing by Teach Preschool

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By | December 5th, 2013|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , , , , |3 Comments

Window tracing on a sunny day

We have big windows all around our indoor classroom and fortunately, they all sit down low enough for my students to see outside anytime and even to enjoy a little window tracing on a sunny day…

Window Tracing on a Sunny Day by Teach Preschool

We explore window tracing off and on all throughout the school year. To set up our window tracings, we start by drawing or using our printer to print out different shapes, words, or even our names on printable overhead projector transparency film. We then cut around the shapes and use clear packing tape to attach them in different places to our windows…

Window Tracing on a Sunny Day by Teach Preschool

Sometimes, we leave the clear printables up for several days or even weeks along with sheets of thin newsprint paper for the children to stop by and trace anytime they are interested in giving it a try…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

The opportunity to trace in our windows creates an interest in the tracing process but when we see that interest starting to go away, we simply remove the tracers and use our windows for something else for awhile…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

We are intentional in where we place our tracing sheets on the windows, placing some up higher for the taller children and others down low for our shorter students…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

The children use a variety of marking tools for tracing – from markers to crayons. They can choose for themselves and if you are wondering whether our students mark on the windows, all I can tell you is that if they do, it is most likely an accident because I can’t recall a time where I had to remind a student or even tell a student to mark on paper and not the window. The children just seem to naturally know what the purpose is and are more interested in taking home the tracings they made on paper then leaving them behind on the window…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

As you can see, we have spent time tracing our names, characters from one of our Eric Carle books, and lots of shapes…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

Some of our students get quite creative and overlap their tracings as they draw…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

And for those who would like to paint or color in their shapes, they are certainly welcome to do so but I find most of our students prefer to just run and put them in their cubbies to take home…

Window tracing on a sunny day by Teach Preschool

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Links to Grow On

An Outdoor Window Walk by Teach Preschool

DIY Window Easel by Teach Preschool

A Rainbow Stained Glass Window by The Artful Parent

L is for lines

Learning about the sound of the letter L was a fun experience as we played games on lines taped to the carpet and traced lines on the light table…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

The children arrived at preschool one morning to find lines taped to our carpet.  They were instantly intrigued.  “What are these for?” they asked.  Deborah told them that they were lines.   This opened up a discussion about how many lines there were and what types of lines there were.  One child pointed out that she uses lines when writing her name.  Children are so wise…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

We began our day by reading The Line Up Book” by Marisabina Russo.  This is a fun little story about a boy who lines up toys all the way from his bedroom to the kitchen.  All the while, his mother is calling for him to come and eat his lunch.  Over and over she calls him and over and over he says, “Just a minute!”   The kids really enjoyed this book…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

After reading our book, Deborah invited the children to stand up and play a game on our tape lines.  First, she asked them to line up and play follow the leader as they walked up down the lines on the carpet…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

After the game of follow the leader was complete, the children moved to the outer edges of the lines.  Deborah then called out the children’s names individually and asked them to jump, walk, or hop over a wavy line, zig-zag, or straight line.  This was a fun way to explore lines while integrating some large motor play and increasing vocabulary of the different kinds of lines.  Be sure to remove your tape immediately after the children leave so that a sticky residue isn’t left on your carpet…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

Next, we moved on to our centers.  At our light table, I drew lines on transparency paper for the children to trace.  I drew lines going both horizontally and vertically. We have a roll of paper that goes over the light table and transparencies for the children to trace on…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

Tracing lines on the light table promotes hand-eye coordination, as well as pre-writing skills.  The light table was a popular place to be for tracing lines…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

Deborah and I discovered that the children really loved all of the line activities that we prepared.  Stay tuned in for the next few days for more great ideas about how we integrated our study of lines all throughout the classroom…

L is for lines by Teach Preschool

A special thank you to the reader who suggested we purchase this book for our class. We loved it!

Available on Amazon

Links to grown on:

Alphabet maze learning activity by Hands On As We Grow

Making lines in preschool by Teach Preschool

Developing large motor skills by playing on the line by Teach Preschool

Sticky paper shape tracing in preschool

Often times, when I watch my preschoolers try and trace an object, I find them struggling to hold the object in place.  One idea to introduce the tracing process to young children is to have them trace objects on the sticky side of contact paper…

Set out contact paper, sticky side up, on a table.  It will be best to tape or secure the edges of the contact paper to the table so it doesn’t move around or pop up as the children trace their shapes…

Invite the children to firmly press the flat side of a cookie cutter or stencil on the contact paper then use a marker to trace the shape…

We used permanent markers to trace our shapes.  I know that many of you are not too sure about using permanent markers and you will need to use your best judgement. However, I must say that we used permanent markers all throughout our school year and the children did a wonderful job using them, taking care of them, and not writing all over themselves in the process…

Many of my students decided it would be fun to color the insides of their shapes. How the children chose to explore this process was left completely wide open…

A simple way to help hold the tracing tool in place while working on those fine motor skills!

Please note: The use of permanent markers should not be used if they emit a strong odor at this can make them not feel well. This activity may work with other kinds of markers or crayons but I have not tried it yet. Our markers did not have a strong odor.

By | August 14th, 2012|Categories: Reading and Writing Readiness|Tags: , , |3 Comments