DIY Lap boards for preschool

I was recently asked by lots of folks to talk a little bit more about what I call “Lap Boards.”  So for those of you who asked or would like to know more, here are a few details…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

Although I refer to my small boards as “Lap Boards,” I also change what I call them depending on what I am using them for. For example, sometimes I might call them a story board or sometimes a counting board. But essentially, no matter what I call them, they are simply small DIY felt boards…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

I call them lap boards most of the time because we often use them on the floor when working on a process as a large group. The lap board goes on the child’s lap or on the floor in front of each child so that the children can have a sturdy, independent space to place objects on and to work on…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

I like the lap boards for giving children a space to work on for several reasons but probably my top reason is that my DIY lap boards are a quiet space to work on and they are soft so most things we are working with don’t easily roll off the edges when the board get’s bumped or shifted around.

How to make a Lap Board

I always keep at least 11 lap boards in my classroom. Ten of them are for the children to use and one of them is for me to use when I am working with the children on a specific process. I store the lap boards on a top shelf in my classroom to pull down as needed…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

To make the lap boards you will need a set of small art paint canvases. My canvases are around 8″ x 10″ stretched canvas (stretched around a wood frame). I purchase my stretched canvases from places like Walmart or Michaels when I see them go on sale or being sold in a multi-pack for a good price…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

You will also need a supply of white (or whatever color you would choose) flannel to staple around each canvas.  I bought two yards of white flannel and had left-over after covering 12 canvases…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

To make the lap boards, you simply cut your flannel to fit firmly around the edges of each canvas and then stretch the flannel so that it sits nice and tight on across the front of the canvas. Then flip the canvas over and staple the edges of the flannel firmly to the board surrounding your canvas.  I use a staple gun to staple the flannel to my boards…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

If you have too much excess flannel on the inside edges of the back of the canvas, then trim away the excess flannel so that the edges are neat and tidy looking…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

Once the flannel is firmly covering and attached to your canvas, then you now have officially made a lap board…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

You can now use your lap boards during circle time to retell a story with felt pieces you have prepared. Instead of the teacher being the only one to tell a story or having to wait on each child to take a turn, the story board allows all the children to be involved in the story telling process together…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

You can use your lap board in a center for children to count, sort, compare, or explore a variety of materials in different ways. The material will not be so clanky in the classroom as they are on a soft surface rather than a hard table or tray…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

You can use your lap board at a table or on the floor for children to have an individual space to explore whatever type of process you have in mind…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

I have had six of my DIY lap boards for three years without a problem of them being ripped, broken, or ruined in some other way. But last year, I had them laying on the floor and the children stepped on them with muddy shoes which left nice little mud shoe prints on most of the boards that I couldn’t wash out. So this year, I added a few more boards to my collection of boards, took off the old felt off my older boards, and covered all 12 boards with new white felt so they all looked new again…

DIY Lap Boards by Teach Preschool

We introduced the lap boards to our students today for the first time this school year and will begin using them around the classroom as the year progresses. I hope I have answered all questions but if you have a comment or question for me, feel free to leave me a comment below!

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By | September 5th, 2014|Categories: DIY, Flannel Board|Tags: , , , |10 Comments

Storytelling on the easel

This week we have been exploring waves in the ocean through our literature, art, water play, and other experiences in our prekindergarten classroom….

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

If you are ready to take your students on a picture book walk, then I highly recommend the picture book “Wave” by Suzy Lee. “Wave” is a book with no words so when Mr. Hayden sat down to read it with our class, he invited the children to look closely at each page of the book and tell the story in their own words…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

The book begins with a picture of a little girl looking out over the ocean watching the waves come in and out from the shore. As Mr. Hayden opened each new page, our students began discussing what they saw happening on the page.  It was interesting because our girls tended to assume the role of the little girl in the book and told the story from her perspective; “I am running away from the waves!” or “I am mad at the waves!” or “Now I am playing in the waves!”….

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

At the end of our story, the little girl in the book gets soaked when a huge wave comes and lands right over the top of her…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

You will notice that through out the story, the pictures are illustrated in two distinct different colors. The waves are illustrated through different shades of blue and white while the little girl, the seagulls, and anything else on the beach is illustrated through different shades of black (pencil or charcoal type drawings)…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

After the children went on their picture walk with Mr. Hayden and told their own story of each page of the book, Mr. Hayden invited the children to notice how the book was illustrated in this unique way.  Then we invited the children to explore the story again by creating their own picture on the easel with different shades of blue paint and a pencil…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

And this is where my story begins. You see, when I planned for this activity, I was imagining the children simply painting and drawing wavy lines.  But the story had a much bigger impression on the children than I had anticipated. The children started by drawing their own scene with the pencil…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

The scene on the easel was similar to the illustrations in the book. The children used the pencil to draw a person and any other detail they wished to add…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

And then the children began to add waves with the different shades of blue paint…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

The children swished their brush up and down and around towards the person they drew because that is what the wave in the book did…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

As this little girl painted, I could hear her saying things like, “Look Out! Here comes the wave!” and then the ‘water’ would swoosh right over her drawings…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

As she told her story at the easel, her characters began to disappear under the large waves until all the drawings were completely ‘under the shades of blue water’…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

If it wasn’t for having listened as the children painted or having these photos taken as the children painted, then it would be easy to walk by the easel at the end of each child’s turn and think  to yourself, “Wow, another blue blob!”…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

Each child told a story that ended with a large blue blob in the center of their paper but underneath that large blue blob was a story of a mommy or a child enjoying a conversation or a dance or fight with a wave that grew bigger and bigger until everyone got all wet…

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

So when that big blue blob of paint comes home to mom and dad, they will know (or be told by me) that this was a story and not a painting and perhaps their child will be ready to tell them the story too!

Storytelling on the easel by Teach Preschool

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Drawing and story telling with a purple crayon

While I read the classic tale of  “Harold and the Purple Crayon” by Crockett Johnson to my students, I invited them to draw and tell me their own purple crayon story… 

Drawing with Harold and a purple crayon by Teach Preschool

(Be sure to click here if you are having trouble viewing the photos in your email)

I have several versions of “Harold and the Purple Crayon” and I went ahead and shared two of my versions with the children. While I read our first version of the book, the children were given a crayon and a clipboard to draw their own stories…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

Some of the children drew while I was telling the story while others waited until the story was finished before they began to draw. It was interesting observing what the children preferred to do…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

As the children completed their drawings with a purple crayon, I invited those who would like to share their drawings or tell a story about their drawings with us to come up and share…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

Although many of our drawings often looked like long lines going off in different directions, each line still found its way to tell us a story…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

As part of our center time, the children were invited to complete a drawing that I had started on the wall while reading our second version of “Harold and the Purple Crayon.”…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

I pretty much drew the same simple lines Harold had followed in the book only I purposely left out some of the lines so the children could either choose to add them or add their own ideas to our purple drawings on the wall…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

Throughout the morning, the children could stop by anytime they wished and add to our purple drawing but I didn’t get a photo of the drawing in action today but here is a look at the drawing behind the boys playing…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

And a little look at the drawing with the books laying nearby…

Story telling and drawings with a purple crayon

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Sailing across the deep blue sea

If I had more time and the forethought, I would try to have some sort of prop for every book we read in our classroom. Sometimes a simple prop can invite the most dynamic story telling and dramatic play…

Sailing across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

We recently read the simple book Pirate Boy by Eve Bunting. This book is about a little boy who questions what lengths his mommy would go through to rescue him from a band of imaginary pirates…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

This is such a sweet book with the primary focus on a mother’s love for her child being demonstrated through a fun and engaging adventure at sea…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

I knew when I got this book that I needed to make sure that I had a way for my students to retell this story or at the very least, build on the illustrations of the story. I needed a few props…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

I gathered two boxes and decorated (and reinforced) them around the edges with duct tape…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

And I also purchased two “steering wheels” which are really wagon wheels found at Garden Ridge but look incredibly like the wheel on the pirate’s ship in our book. My students were certain it was a real steering wheel from a real ship…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

You might be thinking “Wow that is a big investment for one story prop!” and you would be right if I didn’t have any other plans for my wooden wheels but I have big plans for those wheels. I will put those plans into action as soon as I can get my hubby’s help…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

In the mean time, our students spent the entire morning exploring our deep blue sea in their ships along with the wooden wheels, treasure boxes, some gems and anything else the children decided to add along the way…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

Of course, not every story telling prop or dramatic play prop needs to be extravagant to invite play but sometimes, there are those special items that I just can’t resist…

Across the deep blue sea by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

Sink or Float with Nature by Teach Preschool

Everyday Dramatic Play by Teach Preschool

Promoting Communication Skills by Teach Preschool

Ten tips for keeping a journal in preschool

There are many ways to approach the experience of keeping a journal in preschool. As you read about our journals, I hope you will be inspired to take what we do and run off in a direction that works best for your students. For today, I am just going to give you a little sneak peak at our journals and ten simple tips I use for keeping a journal…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #1: Choose your method for keeping a journal

In our classroom, we use a blank book for our journals. I buy two sets each school year. The pages of the first blank book are usually filled up by the end of December and we begin with a new blank book in January.  I have seen folks use pocket folders with clasps in the center to hold paper, file folders with holes punched in the center, or spiral bound notebooks. Whatever your choice is, keep in mind how your journals will do over the long term (a matter of several months) and how well the children will be able to manage their journals during that time…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #2: Choose where you will keep your journals

We keep our journals in a clear file holder on the wall. The children can get them out on their own and put them away on their own. We talk about this at the beginning of the school year and remind the children not to put their journals in their cubbies but to keep them in our journal holder so we will have them all throughout the school year…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #3: Choose your writing tool for your journals

We use good quality Crayola crayons in our journals for several reasons…

  • One reason is that good quality crayons are bright, colorful, and easier for preschool age children to work with. With colored pencils, for example, the drawings seem to be too light to see clearly. This is due to still building fine motor strength and control.
  • A second reason is that crayons are less messy than using something like markers. Markers will bleed through the paper or smear and in time, this can make for one messy looking journal which does not do a very good job of inviting the children to do their best work. 
  • A third reason is because crayons tend to keep the children focused on the drawing or writing process rather than on exploring a tool. With pencils, for example, our students want to explore the erasing more than the writing or they can easily get distracted by wanting to sharpen their pencils.

So we save the markers, pencils, and other writing tools for the other writing experiences in our classroom and stick with the crayons for our journals…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #4: Consider how often your students will write or draw in their journal

In my classroom, we have journal time once a week but I am considering changing that next year. I think next year we will stick with the once a week for the first half of the year so I can make sure the children have a good grasp on how to use and care for and write or draw in our journals. Then for the second half of our school year, I would like to leave the journal experience open to the children to explore anytime they would like…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #5: Give your students guidance on your journal process 

At the beginning of the school year, I walk my students through the process of opening the cover of their journal, then go page by page until they come to the first page that is still left blank before they begin adding something new.

  • Finding the next new page helps the children to use their journals in an organized fashion.
  • Finding the next new page helps us (the teachers or parents) to go back through the timeline of their journal entries.
  • Starting at the beginning and finding the next new page emulates the reading and story telling process for the kids. 

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #6: Decide whether or not you will write in the children’s journals

After the children complete a new journal entry, they know to bring their journal over to where ever Mrs. Courtney and I are and then they are invited to “Tell us their story.”

  • Sometimes the children will tell us long and elaborate stories and when this happens, we listen to their story then write the “condensed” version using as many of their words as we can. We do not add our own words to the story or modify their story – we just condense it.
  • If the children just tell us a simple title or make a simple statement, then we write that down exactly as we were told – even if their story doesn’t seem to go with their drawing.  
  • We almost always add a quick date below each journal entry for the parents to see the timeline on journal entries when the journals go home.

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #7: Know the stages of drawing

At the beginning of our school year, it isn’t unusual for some of our students to choose one color of crayon and quickly scribble one large blob (for lack of a better word) on their paper then say “I’m done!” We don’t correct this but rather still have the children come and tell us their story.  Even though it may look like a blob to me, it may very well be a meaningful picture to the child and scribbling anything is definitely an important part of the beginning stages of writing. As the year progresses and the children seem ready, we begin applying different techniques to slow the children down and to get them to focus on drawing something more specific in their journals. We try different techniques as needed…

  • Using more than one color. We might tell the children they can draw anything they want but must use at least three different color of crayons in their drawing.
  • Drawing cubes are an excellent way to get children exploring different type of drawing techniques and symbols and stories in their journals
  • Journal prompts (as shown below) work well for our older students.
  • Drawing Prompts (also shown below) work well for most of our students.

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #8: Using journal prompts

A journal prompt can be in the form of a children’s book you have read, a unit your are exploring, a trip you have taken, the weather you are experiencing, a specific word you are highlighting, and the list goes on. There are several ways to give a journal prompt..

  • Prompting from a recent experience: We might mention to the children something like, “You all spent lots of time building a snowman today – perhaps you would like to share something about snowmen in your journals today.”
  • Prompting from a well loved children’s book: We might say something like, “In our book, the children planted a seed and it grew big and tall – perhaps you could draw a story about a seed too.”
  • Prompting from a specific word: We might say, “What is one word you heard us talk about a lot today?” As the children choose a word, we will invite them to consider drawing a picture about that word in their journal and then writing the word in their journal too.

In any case, we still leave the journal process open to what the children would prefer to draw. Sometimes the prompt is needed and preferred and other times, the children will have their own ideas of what interested them that day.

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Tip #9: Using Drawing Prompts

Drawing prompts are similar to the other journal prompts that were mentioned above but when giving a drawing prompt, I actually do a little art lesson on how to take basic shapes like circles or triangles or squares to create a familiar object. A drawing prompt is very helpful for children who need that little extra encouragement to try something new in their journal…

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

Remember, it is important to not take over the journal experience by structuring it too much to meet your own expectations. Use different techniques and prompts to help your students expand on their skills in drawing and story telling where needed but keep any approach or new technique in balance. While inviting new skills for writing and drawing don’t get so caught up on this that you begin to intrude on your students’ ability and opportunity to use their own ideas and imagination…

Tip #10: Encourage your students to tell each other their stories

At the beginning of the year, we only have the children share their journals with the teacher but I have found that towards the middle to end of the year, it is a good idea to invite the children to share their journals with each other. When they share with one another, it brings new value to the journal experience…

  • By sharing their most recent journal entry with each other, the children are gaining even more story telling practice.
  • Sharing their most recent journal entry also encourages the children to reflect on their own thoughts and drawings.
  • I noticed that when the children take the time to share with their peers, they also end up answering questions from their peers about their choices, drawings, or the story.
  • And the process of listening to others tell their stories and the chance to look at other drawings gives the children new inspiration for things they can do in their own journals.

Ten tips for Journals in Preschool by Teach Preschool

I am sure you have other experiences about keeping a journal that would be great for us to know or perhaps you have questions about something I have shared today. Feel free to leave a comment below and we will continue the discussion on journals in preschool.

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

Word Wall Journals

More ideas for Journals can be found here on my Journal Pinterest Board!

By | April 22nd, 2013|Categories: Language Arts, Story Telling|Tags: , , , , |30 Comments

Creating colorful rocks in preschool

We read the delightful little story You be You by Linda Kranz and enjoyed creating our own colorful rocks…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

You be You is about a little fish who swims through the sea, taking note of all the different types of fish he sees.  He sees fish that are big, fish that are small, fish that swim up, and fish that swim down.  It is a fun book that explores how everyone is different.  What makes this book unique is the beautiful illustrations.  Kranz created all of the fish in her story out of smooth stones. Each design is different and they are all so interesting…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

When Deborah finished reading the story, she got out a small bag of stones that were designed similar to the fish in book…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

The children each picked a stone fish story token out of the bag and then lined them up on the floor according to their size…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

Then the children played a movement game with their story tokens.  Deborah read the story again while the children acted out the scenes from the book.  They moved and swam like a fish to the right, and then to the left.  They swam like a fish up, and then down…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool
After finishing their game, the children then went off to explore more rocks throughout the classroom.  At one of our centers, there were smooth, flat river rocks (some were purchased from the Dollar Tree and others were collected by the children) and markers for children to create their own rock designs…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool
The children drew whatever they liked on their stones.  Some children just colored on their stones with their favorite colors…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

While others tried to create fish, like in our story…

Creating colroful rocks by Teach Preschool

When the day was done, each child had a nice collection of rocks to take home.  They each took home their story token fish as well as the colorful rocks that they had created…

Creating colorful rocks by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to grow on:
Making story stones in Preschool by Teach Preschool
Mood stones by Happy Whimsical Hearts
Treasure rocks by Memetales

Count a mouse story telling props and game

As we continue our look at the “Mouse” books by Ellen Stoll Walsh, we read the book “Mouse Count” and had fun with a little mouse counting of our own…

“Mouse Count” by Ellen Stoll Walsh is about a snake who gradually, one by one, collects 10 mice in a jar with plans to eat them for dinner…

However, the mice outsmart the snake when they send him off to find what he thinks will be a great big mouse. While the greedy snake wonders off, the mice tip the jar over and all run away…

After reading the story, we used a few props to retell the story again.  We had a sock snake, a set of 12 cotton ball mice (that Mrs. Courtney made), and a clear plastic jar.

The snake was sly and sneaky as he slithered around picking up mice off the floor by their tails and then dropping them in the jar.  But just as the mice did in our book, the mice tricked this snake too and then tipped the jar so they could all get away…

When the jar tipped over, each of the children quickly picked up a mouse and hid it in their laps or hands before the snake came back…

The snake came back and searched each child to see if they had seen his mice, but the children were not about to tell that snake where the mice were…

Once the snake realized that he wasn’t going to be able to find the mice, he slithered off and then I invited each child to put their mouse in a little jar to take home with them…

A few things to mention…

  1. I told the children that the mice were made of cotton balls and would tear very easily so they had to hold them with gentle hands.
  2. The children had to keep their mouse in a jar and in their cubby until it was time to go home so the snake wouldn’t find their mouse throughout the day.
  3. The mouse in the jar is what I call a “Story Token” – it is a way for the children to remember the story after they get home.
  4. When the parents came for pick-up, I let them know about the jar in the children’s bags so the jars would not accidentally get dropped and broken on the way home.
  5. All the children did a great job taking care of their jars and mice and all the mice made it to their new homes safely!

Mouse Count at the table

To extend our book during center time, the children found more sock snake puppets, a pile of pompoms, and plastic jars…

The children used the sock snake puppets to tell their own stories and to pick up the pompoms (mice) to drop in the jars…

Making the mouth of the snake open and close to pick up and drop pompoms was a good workout for those fine motor skills. It was also a good chance for the children to dramatize their own snake and mouse stories.  Oh and it may look calm and quiet at this table but just so you know, this was not a quiet table – there was lots of silly snake action going on at that table throughout the morning!

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DIY table top puppet stage and The Three Little Pigs

My students LOVE puppets and puppet shows so I made a few quick DIY puppet stages for the children to play with and introduced the stages to the children by presenting the story of “The Three Little Pigs”…

We have been talking about houses so “The Three Little Pigs” folktale is always a good fit for a housing unit since it includes the discussion of three different types of housing materials…

I collected what I needed for our puppet show including a bundle of sticks, some straw, and a brick and placed it all in a story telling bag. Oh, and of course I had three little pink pigs which I picked up at our local Deals store (kind of like a Dollar Store) and for after our puppet show, I decided to read this version of “The Three Little Pigs” by Paul Galdone which is based on the original folktale.

Now that I had all my materials together for the story of The Three Little Pigs, I also needed a puppet stage so I cut out a table top stage from a piece of science board which I also purchased at Deals. I started by cutting the cardboard science board in half (which gave me two table top stages)…

Next, I cut a hole in the middle of each stage and Mrs. Courtney helped me paint the back of each one.  I made three total for our puppet show and a few extra for play.  I painted one red (for brick), one yellow (for straw), and one brown (for wood)…

Instead of telling the original folktale to my students, I told a different version of the story – the one where all the pigs end up in the little brick house together and live happily ever after.  In the original folktale, the first two piggies actually get eaten up by the wolf but for the puppet show, I really didn’t want to have the big bad wolf eat my pink pigs…

The children played the role of the Big Bad Wolf. Each time it was time for the wolf to “huff and puff and blow the house in” the children would huff and puff and blow one of our puppet stages off the table and onto the floor. Then that little piggy would run over to his brother’s house and ask if he could stay with him…

Eventually, all three little pigs ended up in the brick house together only our wolves were not able to blow it down no matter how much they huffed and puffed…

After our puppet show, we read the original folktale of “The Three Little Pigs” by Paul Galdone and then compared the book version with the puppet show version.  My students decided that the wolf was not very nice at all and that if I let them play with my piggies, they would treat them much better than that mean old wolf…

The children have requested a return of our Three Little Pig Puppet show every day since I presented it and I am now preparing our next puppet show which I hope to share with them very soon.  In the meantime, the children have explored the puppet stages and our box of puppets on their own – creating their own puppet shows for each other…

Puppetry is a great way to promote story telling and to foster language, imagination, communication, and more. If you haven’t given puppetry a try – let me encourage you to do so!

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By | November 24th, 2012|Categories: DIY, Story Telling|Tags: , , , , |8 Comments

A story in a box

I am always looking for good ideas or resources that will invite my students to tell me their stories. I went to a conference just about a month ago and the speaker shared a book with us called, “Sitting in My Box” by Dee Lillegard and Jon Agee…

I am mad at myself right at the moment because I can’t find the speaker’s name but here is a photo of her sharing this wonderful book with us. I will come back and add her name as soon as I can find where I put it…

As soon as the speaker shared her wonderful idea of how to invite children to tell their own stories after reading the book, I was super excited and hunted down a copy of my own…

The book is about a little boy who is enjoying a good book about animals while sitting in a box when the animals begin to come and invite themselves to sit in the box too…

Just as the speaker suggested, I brought a box along with me and inside I placed one of each type of animal that was in the book inside the box. As we read the book, I revealed  each animal that was in the box for the children to see…

I then put all of the animals back into the box and told the children that they were welcome to read my new book and retell the story too – then I left the book along with the box out for the children to explore during our center time…

And we had plenty of takers stop by and explore the animals in the box – perhaps telling the story in their own way and sometimes adding new animals – but always using their imagination as they played with the animals and the box or took a picture walk through the book…

After reading our story, I added an idea of my own to the telling of this book and invited the children to help me tell our own “Story in a Box”.  I brought in my own very large box and began the story telling process.  “”Once upon a time, Mrs. Stewart was reading a book when along came ______ and said “Let me in, let me in!””  I filled in the blank with each child’s name and as I did, each child climbed into my box…

One by one, all the children squeezed into my box and then I made them scoot over so I could climb in too!  I suppose I should have already been in the box, like the child in the story, but the kids liked it when I made a big production about having to make them all scoot over so I could squeeze my way in…

And then I lightly pinched each of the children (like the flea bite in the book) and as I did, each child quickly and joyfully jumped out of my box – just like the animals did in the story!

Oh yes, this is a story that we will have to retell again – I love it!

I couldn’t find the book new on Amazon so you may want to look around a bit to see if you can locate a copy to borrow or buy but I am providing the link just to get you started any way…

Available on Amazon

Link to “Sitting in My Box” is a Kindle edition

By | September 27th, 2012|Categories: Children's Books, Story Telling|Tags: , , , |9 Comments

Preparing for the first day of preschool

This is just a quick post to wish those of you getting ready to go back to preschool a VERY blessed year!  It took me all day, but I am pretty much ready to go. I had a few things I still wanted to do but you know how that goes – it is a work in progress…

Tomorrow, I will share more about my completed classroom – but these are a few of the little things we have all set and ready to go…

Journals

I purchased simple blank books for our journals.  Mrs. Courtney added everyone’s name to a journal and they are all set to go…

Math Bags

For those of you who have been following my blog for some time, you probably know all about our math bags.  We will be doing math bags again and I will share more on them as we go along.  If you want to read up on the previous year of math bags, you can start by clicking here: Math Bags. Mrs. Courtney added each child’s name to a math bag and my job was to prepare the parent note to go home with the math bags.  Ummm, I will do that in the morning…

Story Telling Box

I also made myself  two little story telling boxes. Well, they could also be called treasure boxes but I am calling them my story telling boxes for now because I want to really focus this year on helping my students express their own ideas, thoughts, and stories.  I am hoping the story telling box will get us off to a good start…

Okay – like a said, this was a quick post to wish everyone well and share a short update!  Have a great year in preschool!

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