Colorful sprinkle paint pictures

I almost forgot to share with you our colorful sprinkle paint pictures we made a few weeks ago.  So let me get you caught up on this super cool process…

First of all, you should know that we sprinkle painted in our outdoor classroom and the table we used was sitting directly in some very bright sunlight which caused some serious shadowing all around the table.  Taking the photos was a bit challenging but I think we managed quite well in the end…

The children started by sprinkling powdered tempera paint on their paper.  I placed different colors of powdered tempera paint in salt shakers that I purchased from the Dollar store…

The children loved sprinkling their paper with the powdered tempera paint.  They loved it so much so that we kind of had to remind them that a little bit of color would work just as nicely as a lot of color and that it would be very thoughtful if they would save some of the powder in the bottle for their friends to have a try….

Once the children had completed sprinkling the powdered tempera paint on their paper, then they used a spray bottle filled with water to spray the powdered paint…

The children sprayed the entire paper generously with the water so by the time we would lift it off of the table, it was dripping wet…

We ended up setting a bucket next to our paintings to let some of the water drain off before hanging the pictures to dry. Being in our outdoor classroom is almost as good as being outside because it doesn’t matter if paint gets on the floor.  If you are doing this in an indoor classroom, you might want to have lots of newspaper handy to cover the space under and around the table…

As each child decided they had sprinkled enough water on their paint, we drained off a little of the excess then hung them up…

During our painting process, the children liked to watch each other sprinkle the paint and water.  I even had two students who decided to stop by and look at the paintings through a magnifying glass…

One of our youngest students held the magnifying glass over a color and would ask her friend, “And what color is this?”  And her friend would answer with the correct color – “That is red.”  The girls went through each color on the paper before moving on.  I had to wait to hang up the paper to dry until I was sure their little color review was completely over…

Because the shadows were so dark around our work space, the children also enjoyed checking out their shadows as they painted…

And here I thought this was just going to be a simple art activity!  Instead, it turned into a color review and exploration of light and shadows. It’s always good to keep your plans flexible to those natural learning opportunities that can surprise you along the way…

Oh, and I almost forgot to mention how the texture of the powdered paint ranged from bumpy, to damp, to watery on the children’s papers.  What an excellent process for exploring texture and color and with all the spraying, our hands got a good fine motor work out too….

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Writing with light and shadows

On occasion, I like to pull out my overhead projector for the children to enjoy a little exploration of light and shadows.  On this occasion, I invited the children to explore the overhead projector in a number of ways…

To start out, I set up the projector so it pointed to a large wall and covered the wall with white paper to use as our projecting canvas…

While some of the children arranged shapes (plastic gems) on the projector the other children used a crayon to try and trace the shapes on the wall. As you can see, our light was a little bigger than our paper so we had to try and find the shapes that were actually on the paper before drawing…

The children also used the light and paper on the wall to try and draw their own shadows…

This was particularly challenging since the children had to figure out how to stand out of the way of their shadow and still draw around their shadow all at the same time…

There are many ways we can explore light and shadows with the overhead projector but this was the children’s first time to explore with the overhead projector so for today, the children focused primarily on using their eyes to follow the shadows and their crayons to either trace or to mark the shadows…

Super simple and very fun too!

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Links to Grow On

Art Project: Overhead Projector from Tinkerlab

S is for Shadow from Preschool Daze

Using the Overhead Projector from Teaching Two and Three Year Olds

Exploring groundhog day in preschool

We made a few work boxes for Groundhog Day that we are planning to use tomorrow. But since there is a snowstorm going on right now, it looks like we may not have school tomorrow…

This first work box is to work on a little eye-hand coordination and some pretend play. The clothespins are our groundhogs and the construction paper covered cups are our holes in the ground.

This next work box is a shadow matching game. The children simple match the black shapes to the white shapes. We can talk about shadows, shapes, and opposites with this simple activity.

The focus of our third work box was a little groundhog sensory play…

We simply filled a container with brown pom-poms, cups and spoons for the children to play with, sort, and and manipulate!

Here are a few other Groundhog Day activities you can check out…

Shadow Theater from The Amazing Mess

Shadow Stomp from The Amazing Mess

Groundhog Shape Craft from Almost Unschoolers

Shadow and Light play from StrongStart