Lots of drops

The word “drop’ all by itself is a fun word but to combine the word with other words like gum drops, lemon drops, and rain drops the word “drop” can lead to even more fun…

I introduced the song, “If all the rain drops were lemon drops and gum drops” by writing the word drop on this chart….

I asked my students to help me think of picture words we could add to the word “drop” to make a new word. To get them started, I drew a raindrop on the paper and the children easily caught on to the idea and then with a few hints from me, the children came up with the words, “gum drop, and lemon drop.” …

And this is where I messed up. I was so focused on introducing the children to that song that when one of my students added the word “strawberry” to our list of drops – I didn’t think to just run with it and let the children make up more fun-drop words!  Don’t you hate when you miss a fun opportunity because you were too focused on your own agenda?  Well I missed it.  I added the strawberry but when we went to sing the song my student said, “and don’t forget about the strawberry drop!” But I didn’t add the strawberry drop to our song…

If I had to do this all over again – and I hope I get the chance – I will just change that silly song to whatever drop my students like.  I mean, how hard would have been to sing, “If all the raindrops were strawberry drops and ____ drops!”  Well even though I regret my missed opportunity, the day didn’t stop there and soon my students were having fun making gumdrop sculptures…

The children found gum drops and toothpicks set out to explore any way they wish…

In fact, we were actually engineering all kinds of shapes and structures with gum drops…

But one little girl spent more time at the table than any one else and what do you think she was busy making?  Yep – lollipop gumdrops…

She had orange drops, lime drops, strawberry drops, grape drops, white drops, all lined up in a row. Now if I had followed the lead of my strawberry drop girl earlier, we could now be singing, “If all the lime drops were orange drops and grape drops!”  But no, I dropped the ball completely! Darn, darn, darn!!…

We could have went back to our chart and added more drops later in the day but sometimes a missed opportunity is just that – a missed opportunity.  By the time the children were done playing in all of our centers for the morning, they had moved on to other topics of interest…

 

I assure you, the children didn’t feel or perhaps even notice this missed opportunity to expand on one of their ideas but I am telling you this story today so that you won’t have to go home kicking yourself like I did.

If your students take an idea you share to a place you didn’t expect it to go…

Just go!

Change the song, change the plan, make up something new – but whatever you do – DON”T DROP THE BALL like I did and miss out on an opportunity that may just be better…

So in the end, my students didn’t remember the raindrop song at all. Boo hoo (add tear drops to that list)! In the future, I hope I can remember to really listen to what my students are saying and follow their lead. I don’t want to have to keep writing posts about how I missed out on a moment that was most likely irreplaceable…

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G is for gumdrops in pre-kindergarten

Yesterday, I shared with you how the children enjoyed making AB patterns with gumdrops for the letter “Gg” week in pre-kindergarten. Another activity the pre-kindergarten children loved was making gumdrop sculptures and designs…

The teacher set out a bunch of gumdrops and toothpicks.  Other than showing the children how they can connect two gumdrops together with the toothpicks, there were no other instructions involved. The children just went to work…

It was such a pleasure observing the children work with the gumdrops. The children ended up with all kinds of wonderful designs…

And the children stayed engaged for a very long time.  This little boy told me he was making lollipops. He just kept putting one toothpick in each gumdrop and setting on his paper plate then he would do it again. In the end, he decided he wanted to taste one but when he went to bite it, the toothpick broke off into the gumdrop. This really surprised him and me – so I suggested to just eat a gumdrop or two that hadn’t been part of our play and didn’t have any toothpicks in them and he happily obliged!

This was not only a creative experience but this was also a great work out for our fine motor skills!

Some of the children kept their gumdrop creations on the paper plates – working within the boundary of their paper plates….

Other children quickly opted to get rid of the paper plate and spread out across the table…

Some of the children (like the little boy with the lollipops) preferred to work alone and others enjoyed collaborating with each other…

As the gumdrop designs or sculptures began to take shape, many of the children began to give their creations a name like “lollipop, necklace, stars, ferris wheel!”  I just preferred to call them all AMAZING!!

By | October 24th, 2010|Categories: Mathematics, motor skills|Tags: , , , |4 Comments