Painting up perfect squares (Piet Mondrian style)

In my previous post, I shared with you the book, “Perfect Square” by Michael Hall which we read aloud in our circletime. As another followup to our book, we explored the painting process by painting squares in the style (or influence) of Piet Mondrian

The children were invited to explore the painting process by painting inside the squares with any color of paint they liked…

For today, we added the tape to the squares of cardboard for the kids so they could just focus on the painting process. When we explore this process later in the school year, we will invite the children to create their own taped lines and not worry so much whether they make squares or not.  Even we had a hard time making perfect squares but the children didn’t seem to mind…

Each child chose the color or colors they wanted to use in their squares. Some children chose to paint every square the same color…

Other children chose to paint every square a different color…

Other children were very systematic in how they chose to paint in their squares while others just painted the squares without a plan in mind…

Mrs. Courtney and I planned to remove the tape from the squares after they paintings dried but they were so lovely with the tape left on that we decided perhaps to leave the tape on.  This is why we chose to use cardboard, thinking the tape would remove more easily without tearing the paper. But  we are still undecided and the paintings are still sitting in our drying rack waiting to go home…

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Links to Grow On

Inspired by Mondrian: Art for Kids from The Imagination Tree

Painting with Scissors Like Henri Matisse from Little Running Teacher

By | September 10th, 2012|Categories: Around the Classroom, Creative Art|Tags: , , , , |11 Comments

Abstract fire truck art in preschool

Last week we explored firefighters and fire safety. I prepared several different kinds of activities and this one was one of my favorites in many ways…

I invited the children to make a fire truck with yellow, red, and black tape.  Before they made their own trucks, I gave them a little tutorial on how they could use the red tape to make a rectangle for the truck and a square for the cab. And they could use the black tape for the ladder and wheels, and the yellow tape for the sides.  Since creating a picture with tape is a new process for this class, I wanted to give the children some perspective on making a firetruck with the tape.

Then I set out some paper, tape, and black markers so the children could try and make their own. The following firetruck is the one I made while providing my little tutorial…

Some of the children needed help getting the tape off of the roll and others figured out how to get their own tape. For those that needed a little help, I either held the tape out so they could cut it where they wanted or I asked them if they wanted a long or short piece and handed them the tape.  By the end of the process, most of the children were pulling or cutting off their own tape…

I invited the children to create their own version of the firetruck. As the children created their tape firetrucks, they would say things like “Now I need a ladder” or “This is my window” kind of like what I said in my tutorial…

Oh we had ladders and windows and firetruck pieces going every which direction.  This is why I titled this Abstract Firetruck Art!

The children were able to see their own firetrucks in their work  – and I was able to see it as well, no matter which way I turned the paper…

Some children drew in a few passengers on their trucks as well…

And others added a few letters or “words” of their own on their paper…

On my wall, I now have a wonderful collection of firetruck abstract art…

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Fine Art in preschool and kindergarden

We have a wonderful kindergarten teacher that allows me to come in and observe her children in action any time I am available. Over several weeks, this classroom has been working on a collection of their own fine art modeled after many famous artists.

They each made their own art portfolio to keep their collection of fine art in as they studied the style of each artist.

With each artist they studied, the children kept a short log of information.

 

The portfolios included a folder to place their own work they modeled after each artist. Here are some of the finished pieces of their fine art!

Henri Matisse


Claude Monet


Georgia O’Keeffe


Pablo Picasso

Vincent Van Gogh


Georges Seurat


Books on Amazon

 

Links to Grow on

Be sure to check out this fine collection of preschool fine art by No Time for Flashcards!

By | August 6th, 2010|Categories: Fine Art|Tags: , , |6 Comments