10 ways to manage holiday stress in the classroom

As we begin our holiday season here at Teach Preschool, we are reminded of the many ways our lives can feel stressful.  We’ve compiled a list of ten ways to reduce your classroom stress during this holiday season…

10 Ways to manage holiday stress in the classroom by Teach Preschool

1. Plan ahead:  Almost all teachers will have their students create some sort of gift for parents.  Determine what supplies you will need for your gift, wrapping, and cards.  Purchase your supplies well in advance to avoid the hassle of running from craft store to craft store at the last minute.

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

2. Set your sights at preschool level: If all of the beautiful blogs and Pinterest posts give you inspiration to create new activities and crafts for your classroom, then look all you want.  If, however, you start to feel overwhelmed or inadequate in any way, then walk away and use the resources and ideas you already have. Remember, most of the beautiful and flawless ideas you see online are made by grown-ups and not by a large group of preschoolers.

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3.  Keep it fun and simple:  If you are making gifts, let it be fun and don’t choose something so complex that you end up doing all the work. Keep it simple and child-made!

Christmas gift and card

4.  Give yourself the gift of time:  Once you are ready to tackle the gift creating process, take it one day at a time.  If your gift involves paint or glue, be sure to give it a day or two to dry before you do your wrapping.  There is no need to make gifts, cards, and wrapping paper all in one day.  Spread it out throughout the week and be sure to make arrangements for children who will inevitably be absent during this time.

Writing on Christmas Cards

5.  Put classroom issues on the back burner, at least temporarily:  Having trouble getting your children to share or clean up?  Are you struggling to get your children’s attention during circle time?  Don’t sweat it!  As long as the children are safe in your care, small issues can wait until the holidays are passed.  Think of the New Year as a fresh start for everyone.

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6.  Plan for fun:  This time of the year can feel chaotic, with the children being a bit more ramped up than usual.  Continue to maintain your regular classroom routine and schedule, while adding in fun holiday themed elements through center play and circle times.  If you are planning a special day with a party or completely different routine, try to schedule it for the last day before break.

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

7.  Don’t let the holidays get you down:  If you aren’t able to celebrate the holidays in your classroom, there are plenty of other ways to explore the season without it being holiday oriented. Winter is a wonderful time to explore snow and ice, hibernation, winter animals, and even baking.  Rather than focusing on what you can’t do, challenge yourself to make the best out of what you CAN do.

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8.  Don’t be a slave to tradition:  Don’t feel as though you have to do everything that you or your fellow teachers have always done in the past. If time or money is an issue, then give yourself a break. The children will never know otherwise.

10 ways to lessen classroom stress during the holidays by Teach Preschool

9.  Get outdoors as much as possible:  With all the excitement of the holidays, young children need to be able to go outside and run! It may be cold but time spent outside enjoying the fresh air every day will help everyone feel happier.  It will also help curtail a little bit of the classroom rambunctiousness that comes along with the holidays.

Building a snowman

10. Take care of yourself:  Holidays in the classroom are fun! It is often the shopping, wrapping, and baking outside the classroom that can be stressful. Take time to relax. Schedule a time for you to get your hair or nails done or to have coffee with a friend.  After all, you can’t be your best in the classroom if you aren’t taking good care of yourself.

10 ways to manage holiday stress in the classroom by Teach Preschool

Now it’s your turn…

Do you have any other tips for reducing classroom stress that you can share? Leave us your tips in the comments below!

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By | December 1st, 2013|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , |6 Comments

Exploring cornucopias

Holidays present a wonderful opportunity to expose our children to new ideas and vocabulary.  We recently explored a new word with our children as it relates to our  up and coming Thanksgiving feast.  That word was cornucopia…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

With our Thanksgiving feast fast approaching, we wanted to explore the many different types of foods that are served at a traditional Thanksgiving meal.  The word cornucopia isn’t a word that we use very often.  It is a word that was unfamiliar to most of our children.  A cornucopia is also sometimes referred to as a “horn of plenty” and is a traditional Thanksgiving symbol…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

On our large tray, we spread out many different types of play fruits and vegetables.  We also set out paper bags to use as our cornucopias.  The children pointed out some of their favorite fruits and vegetables and we discussed some that may have been unfamiliar to them like egg plant…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

We then invited the children to fill their horns of plenty with all of the fruits and vegetables that they would like to eat at their Thanksgiving feast…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

The children grabbed a bag and began filling their cornucopias to the brim…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

This activity gave the children a chance to explore lots of new words and they were eager to tell us all about the contents of their cornucopias…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

The play with our pretend fruits and vegetables continued all throughout the week as the children went to the grocery store…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

We also found several books that talked about the kinds of foods people often eat at their Thanksgiving feasts including this fun book titled “One is a Feast for Mouse: A Thanksgiving Tale” by Judy Cox. This book is about a mouse who went off to gather as many left-overs as he could carry from the family table to enjoy a feast for a mouse…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

The little mouse in our book tried to balance as many things from the Thanksgiving feast table as he could. He balanced things up high but soon it all came tumbling down to the floor and in the end, he was left with one little pea which was exactly just the right amount for a feast for one…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

We used our pretend food to retell the story of the little mouse as we worked together to balance the food from our cornucopias on a plate just like the mouse did…

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

Keeping all that food from falling off the plate as we walked across the room was a very big challenge.  Perhaps, just like the mouse, we don’t need quite so much food for a feast after all!

Exploring cornucopias by Teach Preschool

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By | November 25th, 2013|Categories: Children's Books, Holiday Ideas, Thanksgiving|Tags: , , |1 Comment

The value of a paper plate pumpkin

There is something so simple yet rewarding about making paper plate pumpkins.  I know, because I sat down with my class and made my own paper plate pumpkin and found the process to be quite relaxing, creative, and fun…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

Being an avid blog reader, I see some of the most amazing and even elaborate ideas that I would just love to share with the children in my classroom. But then I realize that sometimes, what my students need from me is the opportunity to make something simple…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

We do quite a bit of art but most of the time it is focused on design, color mixing, or some kind of new tool or process that the children can explore but when I asked my students “Who wants to make a paper plate pumpkin”  Every hand shot up in the air…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

Although the process was simple, I will explain this part….

The paint is a mixture of orange washable tempera paint with a puddle of glue mixed in. This lets the children add a stem or or other paper features without having to wait for the paint to dry. Because the paint has glue mixed in, the pieces stick on nicely when the paint dries. Adding the glue to the paint also gives the paint a nice, thick and smooth texture that is somewhat shiny when wet and very pleasing to paint with…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

As the children went to work creating their pumpkin, they used lots of descriptive words to describe what kind of pumpkin they were going to make. Like, “I am making a mean pumpkin.” or “My pumpkin has one square eye.” Or the children shared stories about going to the pumpkin patch to pick their own pumpkin and making a jack-o-lantern with mom or dad…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

Some of the children chose to tear the construction paper into pieces and others chose to cut the paper with a pair of scissors. While the children cut or tore paper, they would ask me questions along the way about how to make a triangle which gave me the opportunity to give them tips on cutting different shapes….

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

Because the children already understood what a pumpkin was and had a good idea of how to make a pumpkin face, they spent more time in conversation with each other during the process and spent much more time focusing on the basic fine motor skill of cutting or tearing paper…

The value of a paper plate pumpkin by Teach Preschool

If you are like me and for some reason you are worried that making a paper plate pumpkin wouldn’t be “process oriented” enough then think again. I suppose if you cut out all the pieces for the children and insisted that the pumpkin must have triangle eyes, then the focus on process would be lost along the way. But if you are giving the children ample freedom to explore the process in their own way then making a paper plate pumpkin can add just as much value to the skill building process as one of those elaborate ideas floating around on Pinterest.

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Links to Grow On

Pumpkin Seed Soup by Teach Preschool

Pumpkin Suncatchers by Here Come the Girls

Tape Resist Pumpkins by Sew Sprout Play

By | October 18th, 2013|Categories: Halloween, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Pumpkin seed play dough

I have already shared with you our pumpkin seed soup but our pumpkin seed play didn’t stop there. The children also enjoyed spending time playing with pumpkin seed play dough…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

At  the table, the children found four tubs of pumpkin seeds with plastic cups and spoons.  The children jumped right in and began their play by scooping, feeling, and exploring the seeds…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

The children were loving the process as it was but then one of my parents showed up and gave us some beautiful orange homemade play dough that  would be a fun addition to our pumpkin seed sensory tubs…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

The children were free to explore the seeds and the orange play dough any way they wished but since we had started off our morning circle by talking about and exploring real pumpkins, the combination of the two materials naturally invited the children to make their own pumpkins…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

So the children pushed the pumpkin seeds into the orange play dough to make their own “real” pumpkins…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

It was actually quite interesting because once the seeds began to get folded into the orange play dough, it looked very much like the children had scooped out the pulp and seeds of a real pumpkin…

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

And later in the day, that is exactly what we did only the insides of our real pumpkins were much more ooey and gooey!

Pumpkin Seed Playdough by Teach Preschool

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By | October 13th, 2013|Categories: Halloween, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

100 Acts of kindness | Share a heartprint

Today, I am bringing to you this wonderful project titled 100 Acts of Kindness hosted by Toddler Approved. Each week a new blogger is sharing a new “Kindness Challenge” to inspire and invite you to go out there and spread some kindness too…

Week 3 Challenge: Share a heartprint

To help my students understand how they can promote kindness, we began by reading this wonderful book titled, “Heartprints” by P.K. Halliman…

100 Acts of Kindness: Sharing Heartprints by Teach Preschool

Throughout the book, there are many different acts of kindness illustrated by the characters in the book and surrounding each act of kindness are lots of heartprints…

100 Acts of Kindness: Sharing Heartprints by Teach Preschool

What you can do…

To invite my students to be kind to each other and to look for kindness being shared by others at school or at home, I gave each child an envelope filled with construction paper hearts….

Share a Heartprint by Teach Preschool

We also created a kindness board for the teachers to fill up with heartprints as we see the children being kind to one another…

Heartprint board by Teach Preschool

As the children saw someone being kind, they were encouraged to give them one of their hearts or to take their hearts home to share them with their family and friends (which is an act of kindness in itself)…

Giving a Heart by Teach Preschool

And as Mrs. Courtney or I saw the children being kind to one another in the classroom, we printed their act of kindness on a heart and put it on our wall…

Printing kindness on a heart print

The kindness challenge

My kindness challenge to you today is to cut yourself up a set of paper hearts and share them with others. Look for acts of kindness or share an act of kindness by giving someone a heartprint today…

Share a Heartprint by Teach Preschool

Be sure to stop by Toddler Approved to see all the other Acts of Kindness that will challenge and inspire you…

 

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Holiday in a box

I find that at the end of any holiday we celebrate at home or in my classroom, I often have a variety of different objects left over. A fun and simple way to use up those holiday left-overs is to invite your students to make their very own “Holiday in a Box!”…

Holiday in a Box by Teach Preschool

To make a holiday in a box, you will need a box to start with.  In the past, we have used shoe-box lids and cardboard jewelry boxes.  This year, we used some left-over square gift boxes. We used both the bottom and the top of each box as a holiday box…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Oh, and to go along with our holiday boxes, we read the book “There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed A Bell!” by Lucille Colandro.  This book ties in nicely since it seems the old lady likes to swallow many of the things we used in our holiday boxes…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

To fill our holiday boxes, we used items that we had on hand like bows, bells, candy canes, ribbon, ornaments, and glue. You can modify the objects you collect and set out to represent the holiday(s) your are celebrating in your own classroom…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

To make the holiday boxes, the children set their boxes up at one table and made a large puddle of glue into the box…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Next, the children tilted their boxes different directions until the glue covered the entire bottom of the box…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

I would say that the amount of glue varied in each box but we added enough so that the holiday objects would sit down into the glue just a little bit…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Once the children added the glue to their boxes, then the children went to the other table to select what they wanted to put inside their boxes.  To slow the children down just a bit and to get them to think about what they wanted in their boxes, I told the children they could only select one item at a time from the table to put in their box then they could go back again and select another and so on…

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As the children added things to the glue in their holiday boxes, they took their time to decide where they wanted the items to lay. In other words, they made their own designs…

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We have done these types of glue boxes before so my students have a good grasp on what it means to take time to think about where they want things to go in their boxes rather than just rushing around and tossing things any old place in the box…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Once the children added their items to their holiday boxes, we set them aside to dry for a few days.  The length of time for drying will depend on how much glue the children used to begin with.  I find that if I set the boxes up where they are not laying completely flat on the floor, they will dry faster…

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Here are a couple of our completed boxes…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

And this is a set of our holiday in a box after they were almost completely dry (a few still had a little bit of wet glue dripping when we set them up on the shelf). Once the holiday boxes are all up where we can see them, we can play the “I Spy” game!…

Holiday In A Box by teach Preschool

Links to Grow on

Here are a few other glue boxes we made…

Math Glue Boxes by Teach Preschool

Nature Glue Boxes by Teach Preschool

And this is the holiday boxes made by The Seeds Network last year…

Seasonal Shadow Boxes by The Seeds Network

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Christmas Party Games for Preschoolers

We had our annual Christmas party today and it was a whirlwind of activity, wrapping paper, pajamas, pancakes and a few simple games that I thought I would pass along to you – just in case you are in need of a couple of last minute ideas…

Christmas Party Games by Teach Preschool

Ornament Toss

I made an ornament toss game out of a big box (found at the local recycle center). I painted a Christmas tree on the box with liquid tempera paint and cut a few holes in the box large enough for our unbreakable ornaments to fall through…

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

The back of the box was left open so the children could lift the box to take the ornaments back out and play again.  I put a soft sheet of foam on the ground to keep the ornaments from making a loud crashing sound every time one dropped through the box and landed on the hard tile. The foam sheet also helped mark where to place the box when the children set it back down to play again…

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

I also had an easel that was left standing just in front of the ornament game for the children to keep “score”.  They could place a mark next to their name each time an ornament went into the hole. The children however, didn’t actually keep close track – they just put as many marks next to their name as they liked…

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

This was an easy game for the children to stop by throughout the morning and play whenever they wished and pretty much any way they wished…

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

Gift Box Game

The gift box game was played as a large group.  I wrapped a large box (also picked up from the recycle center) so it looked like a really big gift. The children found the box sitting with gifts on top of it when they came into the classroom.  The children were anxious to find out what was in that box…

Christmas Party Games and Activities by Teach Preschool

Before playing our game, I let the children guess what they thought might be in the box.  We had some great guesses including a television, a computer, and a new kitchen for our housekeeping center. But when I lifted up the box, the children discovered it was actually a big empty box. To play the game, one child left the group to hide his or her eyes then we chose someone from the group to hide under the box.  Then the first child came back and had to guess who was missing from the group…

The children found the box sitting with gifts on top of it when they came into the classroom.  The children were anxious to find out what was in that box!

The children loved taking a turn to hide under the box and it was quite challenging trying to figure out who was missing from our group.  We gave lots of hints as to who might be in the box (and often even mentioned the name of who was under the box – just to help out a little of course). I let each child choose if they would like to hide inside the box or not just in case someone didn’t feel comfortable but everyone wanted a turn.  I also kept the game moving along so no one stayed under the box too long…

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For independent play, the children liked to hide objects under the box and some of the children just wanted to hide inside the box on their own.  The only rules were that no one could pound on the box or hold the box down while someone was inside the box.  We didn’t have any problems but just to be on the safe side, I did make those two rules…

Christmas games and activities from Teach Preschool

Pass the Bow

We used this game to help the children pick a present from our gift exchange under the tree. To play the game, the children passed the bows around the circle while we all sang (well mostly I sang) Jingle Bells.  When the singing stopped, whoever was holding a bow went to pick a present under the tree then brought it back to the circle and put it in their lap…

Christmas Party 028

I used two bows so I didn’t end up with just one child still waiting to pick a present and so the children didn’t have to wait so long to get a gift.  I stopped singing systematically so that the bow would always land on someone who didn’t yet have a gift in their lap…

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

Once the children all had a gift – they jumped right in opening them up! Oh the excitement of it all!

Stocking Jounals

At the table, the children found construction paper stockings, glue, scissors, cotton balls, scraps of gift wrap, and crayons to decorate and use as a stocking journal….

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

The children were invited to draw pictures of things that go into a stocking.  Not every child chose to make a stocking journal because we had so many things going on all day and some children chose to take a journal home to decorate and draw in instead…

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

Some of the children asked the teachers to label their objects in their journal as well…

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

As I mentioned at the beginning of the post, this was a pajama and pancake party too so we definitely had to make our own pancakes. The children helped mix up a batch of pancake batter then Mrs. Courtney put the pancake batter into squeeze bottles for the children to squeeze out their own pancakes on the griddle.  We didn’t let the children do any more of the cooking part because the griddle was too hot…

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

The children were curious  if the pancakes would taste different because of the different colors but they soon discovered that the pancakes all tasted the same…

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

These were just a few highlights of our Christmas/Pajama/Pancake party that I thought might be helpful in your own planning!

Christmas games and activities by Teach Preschool

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By | December 21st, 2012|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , , , |14 Comments

Designing our own shiny gem ornament graphs

Did you know math can be shiny and beautiful?  Well it just so happens that in my classroom, math can be very shiny and beautiful when you are designing your own shiny gem ornament graph…

First of all, I should let you know that I had planned to print up some graphs for my students to use for this graphing activity but by the time math day came around, I never got around to making the graphs. So, I decided that I would invite my students to design their own graphs…

I started by giving the children some guidance on how to draw a graph using a ruler and a pencil. We talked about how to draw our lines so we had columns.  Now you may be thinking, “Isn’t this too hard for preschoolers?”  In the back of my mind, I had no idea how much of this my students would fully grasp but I wasn’t worried about whether or not they drew a graph like mine. My goal was to introduce the graph drawing process then let the children go off to the table  and interpret the process in their own way…

I also showed the children how I could spread my jewels out on the graph and then sort them into the columns. My large group graph designing lesson lasted all of about five minutes…

Then the children were off to the tables where they had paper, rulers, pencils, and a plastic ornament filled with about 20 jewels waiting for them to design their own graphs…

Every child did a remarkable job drawing their own graphs.  We had some that turned out very much like the graph I had drawn for them and others were a modified version of the graph I had demonstrated but all of the graphs were outstanding…

As each child completed his or her graph, they dumped their gems out of the ornaments and onto their paper to begin the process of sorting and graphing.  Some of the children completed their graphs quickly and others took their time to complete the graphs.  Each child made their own decision as to whether or not their graph was ready for sorting and graphing gems…

Then the children began sorting the gems on their graphs. Again, the way each child organized their gems depended on how his or her graph was designed…

Most of the children sorted their gems by the type or color of gem…

Some of the children sorted and lined their gems up in each column of their graph…

Other children sorted and grouped their gems into squares on their graphs…

As the children completed their graphs, Mrs. Courtney and I walked around and asked the children questions like “Which column on your graph has the most gems?”…

And “Which column on your graph has the least number of gems?”…

The process of designing their own graphs combined with the beautiful gems created an interesting process for the children to explore…

Points to Ponder

  • I do not recommend sitting children at a table and having them follow you step-by-step through a process like this.
Having the children follow you step-by-step doesn’t allow students to work at their own pace and it puts pressure on the children to perform or do what you do rather than encourage children to think for themselves and build their own understanding of the process. Having the children follow you step-by-step also removes the opportunity for you to observe the children and reflect or assess their understanding of the process because they are simply copying you.
  • I do recommend sharing a process such as this, in simple terms, from beginning to end and in as few steps as possible before sending the children off to explore or interpret the process on their own.

By letting the children explore the process on their own, you will be better able to observe what they understand, what they can do, and even evaluate what processes your students are mastering. You will also be better able to determine what processes you need to give the children more experiences with through alternative approaches…

  • And finally, it is important to keep in mind that my students have been exploring the graphing process through many different, hands-on activities like our button sorting shown below. Before jumping into a graphing process like what I have shared today, make sure you are exposing the children to plenty of sorting, organizing, and graphing processes through your centers, play, and other both small and large group activities.

Questions you may have

  • The gems and rulers are from the Dollar Tree
  • The clear plastic ornaments are from Walmart but we also used small, clear water bottles which were just as cool as the ornaments.
  • My students are between the ages of almost four to five.

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By | December 15th, 2012|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas, Mathematics|Tags: , , , , , |5 Comments

Candy cane science in preschool

We explored candy cane science in preschool today by starting with the question, “What will happen to the candy cane if we let it sit in warm water?”

The children started with a clear plastic cup, water, and a candy cane…

The children filled their cup almost full with warm water…

Next, the children placed their candy cane into the water and stirred it around…

As the children stirred, we invited them to observe the water and to see what is happening to their candy cane.  After a few minutes they could easily see that the red stripe on the candy cane was going away and that the water was turning pink in color…

The children set their cups up in the center of the table while they ate snack so they could check back on the progress of their candy canes…

By the time the children finished snack time, they discovered that all of their candy canes were now white and were becoming smaller and thinner in size…

During snack time

After snack time

And by the time the children were ready to go home, the candy canes were completely gone. A total time of about 1.5 hours passed by from the beginning to the end of this experiment…

If you would like to know more about the science behind this activity, hop on over to Preschool Powol Pockets to learn more!

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By | December 13th, 2012|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas, Science and Nature|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Who stole the candy from the candy cane jar?

I borrowed the simple rhyme “Who Stole the Cookie from the Cookie Jar?” and changed it to “Who Stole the Candy from the Candy Cane Jar?” for a game we played together in circle time…

We played the game by inviting each child to take a turn leaving the circle to hide their eyes. Then one child was selected to quietly take a candy cane from the candy cane jar and hide it in his or her lap.  All the other children were reminded that they also needed to pretend to hide a candy cane in their laps…

Once the candy cane was hidden, the children would help me say, “Who took the candy from the candy cane jar?” And the child hiding his or her eyes would come back and begin guessing.  Each time the child made a guess and pointed to a friend, I would say, “Did (friend’s name) take the candy from the candy cane jar?”  And that child would reveal if he or she had the candy cane or not.  Sometimes, we would skip my second question, it just depended on how quickly the game was going. The child continued to guess until he found who took the candy cane…

The child who actually had the candy cane in his hand now went to hide his eyes and we played the game again. Of course, everyone took a turn to hide their eyes and guess who stole the candy cane from the candy cane jar.  We didn’t use real candy canes but you certainly could use real ones for the game…

My students loved the game and asked if we could play it again! Sounds like a good idea to me 🙂

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By | December 12th, 2012|Categories: Christmas, Holiday Ideas|Tags: , , , |2 Comments