Exploring the sounds of glass

Last week I shared with you a little bit about how we have been exploring glass. As part of our study on glass, we spent time exploring the sounds of glass…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

As most of you most likely know, depending on how much water you pour into a glass jar or other glass container then give the jar a gentle tap, the sound of the jar will change.  My preschoolers spent time exploring this very process…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

We had different sized jars available and the children noticed right away that the size of the jar made a difference in the sound of the jar. We talked about the “pitch” of each sound the jars made and whether the pitch was higher or lower…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

After taking a few moments to listen to the sounds of our empty jars, the children were ready to change the sounds of their jars by adding water. Each child chose the amount of water they wished to pour in their jar…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

Once water was added to the jar, each child once again tapped the sound stick against the jar to see if the sound of the jar had changed.  We stopped to take a listen to each jar and to notice if the sounds of our jars had changed and what caused the change…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

The children continued to add water and tap their jars. Along the way, we stopped and listened to the sound of each jar and then we would all tap our jars at the same time…

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

At the end of our exploration of sound jars, we worked together to line up our jars in a long row by the sound of the jar or the amount of water that was in the jar.  Because the jars were of different sizes, we found it was better to organize our jars by the sound they made as we tapped them….

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

The children were then given time to explore the sounds of all the jars and could pour more water in or out of a jar as they decided to do so….

Exploring the sounds of glass by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

An exploration of Sound by Teach Preschool

The Listening Game by Teach Preschool

Exploring Sound by Buggy and Buddy

How Sound is Made by Kids Activities Blog

By | November 18th, 2013|Categories: Science and Nature|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

Thanksgiving: Fun Friday features

Last week our fellow bloggers shared some awesome Thanksgiving activities in the Discover and Explore linky.  Today I’m sharing four different ways to make “gratitude trees” or “thankful trees.”  These trees are a fun way for children to express their thoughts of thankfulness…

Discover and Explore

Mrs. O’Daniels shared these colorful thankful trees that her children made for their grandparents…

Thanksgiving: Fun Friday features

Adventures in Wunderland shared this really sweet handprint thankful tree

Thanksgiving: Fun Friday features by Teach Preschool

Makeovers and Motherhood shared a printable template for their thankfulness trees

Thanksgiving: Fun Friday features by Teach Preschool

And our last feature is a wall of thankful leaves shared by What Do We Do All Day.  While this isn’t a tree, the idea could certainly be extended by creating a tree for these beautiful leaves…

Thanksgiving: Fun Friday features by Teach Preschool

I’d like to thank all of our blogger friends for sharing their wonderful Thanksgiving ideas with us!

And the fun never stops as we continue Fun Friday over on the Teach Preschool Facebook Page.  I invite you to come check out what our fellow bloggers are sharing this week!  To see what others are sharing, you must be viewing a desktop version of the Teach Preschool Facebook Page.  From the Teach Preschool Facebook Page, click the tab just below the header that says Highlights.  Then click on Posts by Others.  We will be sharing a few of our favorite posts on our wall throughout the day.

More Thanksgiving Ideas from the Discover and Explore Co-hosts

Thanksgiving Activities from the Discover and Explore co-hosts

Handmade Turkey Puzzle for Thanksgiving (KC Edventures)

Crafts for Kids: Beaded Napkin Rings (Buggy and Buddy)

Turkey Play Dough (Fantastic Fun and Learning)

Planning a Thanksgiving Feast (Teach Preschool)

Fine Motor Turkey Activities for Toddlers (Twodaloo)

By | November 15th, 2013|Categories: Discover and Explore|Tags: , , |2 Comments

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad storybook giveaway

Yesterday I introduced the book “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad” with our Cooking in the classroom post.  Today I am sharing a little bit more about this book along with our fruit salad graph and then stick around to the end of the post to see how you can win your own copy of this book…

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

“End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad” by Eluka Moore is the first book in a new series called the “Kitchen Club Kids.”  Their website states that “Kitchen Club Kids adventures are a rhymey-good-timey story and recipe rolled into one,” and I would have to agree!  The “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad” book is a simple rhyming story that explores fruit, colors, and numbers, making it the perfect addition to any preschool or home library…

Fruit Salad and Sunflower Day 027

The books starts off with a little girl pondering what comes at the end of a rainbow.  She believes that it is a big, beautiful bowl of colorful fruit salad.  The little girl and her brother (aka the Kitchen Club Kids) then proceed to show us how to make that big, beautiful bowl of fruit salad that she envisions.  The book is wonderful in that it explores 10 different types of fruits, some of which our children weren’t even familiar with, like papaya…

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

After reading our story, we then brought out our flannel board graph to chart our own favorite fruits…

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

We used black masking tape to create seven different columns on our flannel board graph.  We cut out various fruit, that our preschool children were familiar with, to include on our chart.  We had a column for apples, bananas, berries, grapes, and so on.  Each child was given a piece of felt with his or her name on it.  The children then took turns coming up to the graph and deciding which fruit they liked the best…

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

When all of the children had chosen their favorite fruit and put their name in that column, we sat back and observed our graph.  Graphs are an excellent way to begin introducing the concepts of more and less, greater and fewer.  We worked on counting which column had the most names, making it the most popular fruit in our classroom.  And we took note of the empty columns, or the least favorite fruit of our class…

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

Our fruit graph was such a fun and easy way to incorporate math into our morning.  And it was a great way to extend all of the wonderful concepts that were introduced in the book “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad.”

End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad giveaway by Teach Preschool

Enter to Win

If you would like to receive updates on the new books in this series, then I would invite you to “Like” the Kitchen Club Kids Facebook page.  If you would like to enter to win a copy of the “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad,” simply follow the giveaway instructions below:

To enter the giveaway:

  • Visit the Kitchen Club Kids website then come back here to this post and leave a comment below telling me something you found that was of interest or new to you on their website.
  • Be sure to leave a correct and current e-mail address when you comment so that I can notify you if you win.

Giveaway rules:

  • This giveaway will be closed on Thursday, November 21, 2013 by 10:00pm EST.
  • The winner of the giveaway will be notified by email and will have 48 hours to respond to my e-mail.  I will then forward the winner’s name and email onto B + B Publishing, the publishers of “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad.”
  • If the winner does not respond within 48 hours, a new winner will be chosen.
  • B + B Publishing will contact the winner to arrange delivery of “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad” children’s book.
  • This giveaway is open only to those who live in the U.S.
  • ONE winner will be chosen from the comments section below by Random Generator.

ENTRIES FOR THIS GIVEAWAY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED BY EMAIL or COMMENTS LEFT ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE.  YOU MUST COME TO THE BLOG TO LEAVE YOUR COMMENT.  THANK YOU!

Good luck and thank you for your participation!

Disclosure: I received “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad” to review and provide this giveaway.  I was not compensated in any other way and all opinions are 100% my own.  

This book is also available on Amazon!

Cooking in the classroom

We recently spent a morning exploring different types of fruit.  With that fruit, we created a delicious rainbow fruit salad.  What we learned is that cooking in the classroom is about so much more than just measuring, slicing, and pouring.  It can be a multi-sensory experience…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

To begin our morning, we read a delightful story called “End of the Rainbow Fruit Salad.”  It is a simple book that explores both colors and numbers, as well as many different types of fruit.  Be sure to stick around because tomorrow we will be giving away a copy of this book!

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

After reading our book, we passed around a few of the fruits that were mentioned in the book…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

We passed around a pineapple, grapes, bananas, strawberries, and a papaya:  all fruits that were about to be used in our fruit salad.  While we passed the fruit around, we talked about using all of our senses to examine the fruit.  What color is the papaya?  How does that prickly pineapple feel on your fingers?  What do those strawberries smell like?  Of course, we would see what it tastes like later.  It was, not only an invitation to explore the fruit, but an opportunity to build language skills…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

Passing our fruit around the circle was also an opportunity to work on sharing and turn taking.  After sharing around our circle, it was time to turn all that beautiful fruit into fruit salad…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

We moved to our larger tables and each child had the opportunity to wash and cut the fruit we just explored.  Some of our fruit required big knives, which only Mrs. Stewart and Mr. Hayden were allowed to use.  The children were given plastic knives to cut the fruit into smaller, bite-sized pieces….

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

If you’ve ever attempted cooking with a large group of children, you will understand that it can be quite a daunting task but it isn’t one you should shy away from.  Our children always love the opportunity to create their own snack.  They are more eager to try a new food, when they have helped create it themselves…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

Working side by side with other children to achieve a common goal requires cooperation and sometimes patience, while waiting for a turn…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

Cooking in the classroom also allows children to explore foods in a completely new way.  None of our children had ever eaten a papaya, let alone had the opportunity to cut it open and scoop out its slimy seeds…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

When all of our fruit was cut, we had a very colorful and delicious rainbow fruit salad.  The children had pride in knowing that they helped to prepare this yummy snack…

Cooking in the classroom by Teach Preschool

Now it’s your turn!  Please share your favorite posts to our
Cooking with Kids linky!

Discover and Explore

Discover and Explore: Cooking with Kids

Upcoming Themes:

Currently Open – Cooking with Kids

November 20 – Life Skills

November 27 – Gifts

December 4 – December Holidays

December 11 – Indoor Games and Play

December 18 – Winter

Please read the following guidelines for sharing:

  • Share family-friendly posts related to the weekly topic — kids activities, crafts, recipes, nature outings, printables, etc.
  • By linking up, you are giving me permission to share your post including one photo in our weekly feature post and on social media channels.
  • Visit 2-3 other posts that have linked up, find some new ideas & meet new friends!
  • If you’d like, grab a button for your post — we love to share and want to find lots of great activities to highlight for you!

The linky will remain open for one week. Then all five co-hosts will feature activities in a separate post the Friday after the linky closes. All featured posts will be shared on the Discover and Explore Pinterest Board.  (Be sure to follow so you don’t miss any features!)



By | November 13th, 2013|Categories: Discover and Explore|Tags: , , , |8 Comments

Exploring and creating with sugar glass

In my previous post, I shared with you how to make sugar glass but be sure to remember that making sugar glass is not a process that can be made by the children or with the children.  But for those of you who like to try new things and have the time to make up a batch of sugar glass, then this post is for you.  Our pre-k only class participated in exploring and creating with sugar glass…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

Before the children explored the sugar glass, we talked about real glass and introduced or reviewed words like breakable, fragile, see-through and so on. We looked for real glass items in our classroom like the windows and talked about how real glass is fragile and should it break, we never ever want to step on it or pick it up. And we talked about how real glass can be melted, molded, and even recycled…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

Then we introduced the sugar glass to the children. We had some sugar glass on a tray in the shapes of letters and pieces for the children to touch and explore. The children noticed that the sugar glass was a little bit sticky (since it had been out overnight). We didn’t try to fool the children into thinking that our panes of sugar glass were pieces of real glass. We wanted the children to know the difference between real glass and sugar glass…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

The children then moved to the table where each child had their own sheet of sugar glass to explore…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

The children were invited to take their pane of sugar glass out of the pan and lift it up so they could hold it, feel it, and look through it…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

The children were invited to see if they could crack the sugar glass but it was too hard to crack with our hands. So the children took turns using a hammer to gently crack their sugar glass into small pieces…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

And yes, the process of cracking that sugar glass with a hammer was super fun and intriguing…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

After each child broke their sugar glass into small pieces, they began to take the pieces out of the pans and put them into a larger pan we had in the middle of the table…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

The children continued adding the sugar glass to our tub until all the sugar glass was in the tub and our cookie pans were empty…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

Next, we added a puddle of glue to each child’s empty pan and the children tilted their pans back and forth until the glue covered the entire bottom of their pans…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

Now it was time to select their favorite colors and pieces of sugar glass to make their own sugar glass designs in the glue…

Stained Glass Day 221

The sugar glass designs were beautiful and fun to create…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

Every child’s sugar glass design was unique and when they were finished, we set them aside to dry for several days…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

During the drying phase, the sugar glass began melting into the glue rather than staying hard so our glue and sugar glass created a stained glass effect but it took a very long time for it all to dry and in the end, we had to send the sugar glass glue mosaics home in the pans…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

We had lots of left-over sugar glass, so we added water to the sugar glass tub so the children could explore the sugar glass a new way.  The water began to dissolve the sugar glass in the tub…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

And much of the sugar glass stuck together and needed tweezers to separate it. And, of course, it was all sticky to the touch…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

After the sugar glass completely dissolved into our water tub, we were able to simply pour it all down the sink while running hot water to keep it going down without building up in the sink…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

We used our sugar glass explorations to talk about the sound of the letter Gg and then to introduce the concept of stained glass which I will share with you very soon as well…

Exploring and creating with sugar glass by Teach Preschool

PS. My students did not ask to eat the sugar glass but although sugar glass is made of sugar, it is incredible difficult to eat and will get all stuck to your teeth so the answer would have been that this glass is simply for us to explore.  But again, no one asked or tried to eat it – they were too busy exploring.

Available on Amazon

By | November 12th, 2013|Categories: Science and Nature|Tags: , , , |7 Comments

G is for [sugar] glass

My assistant, Mr. Hayden, suggested that we explore a little sugar glass in our classroom.  Sugar glass is something that I have never even heard of before so it took a little research to figure out how to make it and to decide how to use it in our classroom. But it was worth the time invested so this post is just an introduction of sugar glass to you and my next post is a how we actually explored the sugar glass. However, I will say right up front that this idea is time consuming to prepare and cannot be prepared in the classroom…

G is for Glass by Teach Preschool

What is sugar glass?

Sugar glass looks and feels and cracks almost like real glass only it is made purely of sugar products. People use sugar glass for lots of reasons but one of the most popular reasons is to emulate the look of glass breaking in movies and videos or as pranks. We didn’t use it for any of those reasons but I will share our use tomorrow…

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

How do you make sugar glass?

First of all, making sugar glass is not [and I mean not] a process that the kids can help you with.  Mr. Hayden and I made our sugar glass at home the night before school.  And it takes about 45 minutes to make up one batch of sugar glass. And it really needs to be refrigerated until the next morning so the sugar glass doesn’t get sticky but I didn’t refrigerate mine…

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

Sugar Glass Recipe

Sugar Glass is actually a science more than a cooking process so to make it, you need to use the recipe exactly as shown rather than estimating the amounts needed.

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • 31/2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cream of Tartar
  • Cooking Spray or Foil
  • Food Color or Liquid Water Color (Optional) (We used liquid water color so it wouldn’t stain our hands during play)

What you will need

  • A large pot with handles
  • A candy thermometer
  • A prepared pan to pour the hot sugar glass in when it is ready for cooling

What to do

  1. Pour the water, sugar, corn syrup, and cream of tartar into the pan.
  2. Stir the mixture while you bring the mixture to a slow boil.  Do not cook it too fast or the sugar will caramelize.
  3. Set your candy thermometer where it will sit up in the pan.
  4. Keep the mixture at a low boil until the temperature on the candy thermometer reaches exactly 300 degrees (which can take anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour).  The temperature will sit at about 225 degrees forever before finally going all the way up to 300 degrees.
  5. Once the temperature reaches 300 degrees, then very carefully and using hot pads remove the pan from the burner and pour the mixture into your prepared pan (see how to prepare pan below).
  6. If you wish to add color, add it either now or stir it in right after you pour it into your prepared pans. I used a plastic spoon to spread the color around my sugar glass and it melted the spoon – that is how hot this stuff is.

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

Caution

The sugar glass mixture is super, super hot and if it spills on your hand, it will cause severe burns. It will stick to your hand and not just wipe away. Do not under any circumstances have small children around while you make this or let them help and keep your own hands protected in the process too.

Prepared Pan

Either cover a cookie sheet with aluminum foil and spray the foil with your cooking spray or spray the cookie sheet directly.  Whatever non-meltable cooking mold you decide to use, be sure to cover the cooking mold completely with cooking oil so the sugar glass will not stick to it.

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

In the end, I decided to use aluminum foil cookie pans instead of a metal cookie pan and just sprayed the pans with cooking oil. One batch of sugar glass was enough to evenly fill two of these smaller aluminum cookie pans (about 1/4″ thick). The sugar glass begins to harden almost immediately but it takes about a full hour to completely cool and harden. If you need to store it over night, it is best to put in the refrigerator. After the sugar glass hardens and cools, you can pop it out of your pan. Because we used aluminum pans, we just bent back the edges of the pans and the sugar glass popped out very easily…

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

So this was a brief look at how to make sugar glass. In my next post, I will share with you how we explored the already prepared sugar glass in my classroom.  It was super cool…

G is for [Sugar] Glass by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

I highly recommend you watch or read other articles about sugar glass so you get a good idea of what it is like and how to make it.

How to Make Sugar Glass on YouTube

How to Make Sugar Glass on Wiki

By | November 11th, 2013|Categories: Science and Nature|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Going on a looking walk

In a recent discussion on the Teach Preschool page on Facebook, one of my readers suggested I check out “The Looking Book” by Patrice Barton. So, of course, I tracked down a copy of the book and loved it immediately…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschooll

The Looking Book” is about two little guys who would rather sit inside all day and watch cartoons until their mom comes up with the genius idea of giving both boys a pair of lookers.  The boys wonder what the lookers are for and then with mom’s help, realize that the lookers are for going outside and looking…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

As the boys begin their looking adventure, they discover lots of really cool things outside and decide that spending time outdoors is a fun idea after all…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

Now just so you know, whether you have a copy of this book or not, anyone can certainly introduce the idea of going on a looking walk.  All you need is a pair of cheap plastic glasses without the lens or you can make a pair of lookers if you happen to be really creative. Add your lookers and come up with your own tale to tell the children about going on a looking walk…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

After reading “The Looking Book,” I gave each child their own pair of lookers to wear. The whole idea of wearing “lookers” was fascinating to the children. Before going outside, everyone tried on their lookers and then we all looked up, then down, then side-to-side and stopped after each turn to shout out what we could see with our lookers on. This helped us practice the skill of looking through lookers. Next, I invited the children to go and grab their jackets so we could head outdoors and go on a real looking walk.  

I purchased packages of cheap kids glasses you get in the party supply area at our local Walmart then actually punched all the lenses out.  I saved the lenses just in case an idea of something we can do with them occurs to me in the near future.

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

The children looked everywhere and would often run to show Mr. Hayden what they found while they were looking…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

By the end of our book, the two boys realized that they didn’t really need lookers to enjoy going outside to play and explore and it wasn’t long before most of my students discovered that they really didn’t need them either…

Going on a looking walk by Teach Preschool

A wonderful way to inspire my students to get outdoors and explore all around them…

Going on a Looking Walk by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow on

Try going outside for a Listening Walk too by Teach Preschool

The Looking Book is also available from Ideals Books

By | November 9th, 2013|Categories: Children's Books|Tags: , , |6 Comments

Science: Fun Friday features

Last week, the Discover and Explore team invited our blogging friends to share their best science activities.  We received a wonderful response and would like to highlight a few of our favorites today..

Discover and Explore

Crafting Connections shared some fantastic ways to encourage young scientists with this practical guide

Science: Fun Friday features

Blog Me Mom shared this really cool red cabbage experiment , along with some great ideas for dramatic play…

Science: Fun Friday features

And Little Bins for Little Hands shared their experience exploring these fun and colorful density towers

Science: Fun Friday features

Thanks so much to all of our blogger friends for sharing their amazing science activity posts with us!

And the fun never stops as we continue Fun Friday over on the Teach Preschool Facebook Page.  I invite you to come check out what our fellow bloggers are sharing this week!  To see what others are sharing, you must be viewing a desktop version of the Teach Preschool Facebook Page.  From the Teach Preschool Facebook Page, click the tab just below the header that says Highlights.  Then click on Posts by Others.  We will be sharing a few of our favorite posts on our wall throughout the day.

Science-Experiments-for-Kids-from-the-Discover-Explore-Co-Hosts

More Science Experiments from the Discover and Explore Co-hosts

Fun Science Activities for Kids (KC Edventures)

Reflections in Mirrors (Buggy and Buddy)

Floating Egg Science Experiment (Fantastic Fun and Learning)

Bubbles in a Bowl Science (Teach Preschool)

Toddler Science Experiments (Twodaloo)

By | November 8th, 2013|Categories: Discover and Explore|Tags: , |2 Comments

Investigating the parts of a spider through fine motor play

Our little scientists spent the last 30 minutes of our day investigating spider parts through this intriguing fine motor building process…

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

This process was simple to prepare but needs at least 24 hours advance notice to get it ready. What you see here are our “spider parts” in gelatin. I have always wanted to try something like this and finally took the time to put it together and it was totally worth it…

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

To make the gelatin molds, I simply used three packets of gelatin and followed the directions on the box. The directions said…

  • Add one cup of cold water and let the water settle a minute over the gelatin.
  • Then add three cups of boiling water (I used a little less) and then stir until all the gelatin is fully dissolved.
  • Next pour your gelatin into your containers (I used little plastic containers my mom collected over time from Kentucky Fried Chicken with a lid).

Then you can wait a bit to let the gelatin gel just a bit and then add items (like spider parts) to the plastic container or do like me and add them right away. Because I was impatient, my googly eyes floated on top and the other heavier pieces sunk to the bottom but it still worked out really well.

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

The children were totally entranced with removing the spider parts from their dishes…

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

Each child had their own spider part dish to explore but I made a few extra and some of the children explored two dishes…

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

The children used their tweezers to pull out the pieces of the spider and set them on a tray….

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

Some of the children even explored the gelatin with their fingers. It isn’t sticky but it is wet and jiggly…

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

Most of my students just enjoyed using the tweezers but whether they used their hands or tweezers to pull out the spider parts, the children were focused on using fine motor skills throughout this very interesting process…

Spider parts investigations by Teach Preschool

We had already talked about the parts of a spider earlier in our day so this process had no intended outcome other than to explore. One little guy shouted out to me each time he pulled out a new spider part – “I did it!”  Super fun!

Investigating the parts of a spider by Teach Preschool

My blogging buddy over at Fun at Home with Kids has some amazing examples and recipes and ideas for Gelatin Play that you will want to hop on over and check out.  She totally had me inspired to give our spider part investigation a try!

Available on Amazon

By | November 7th, 2013|Categories: motor skills, Science and Nature, Sensory Play|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Planning a Thanksgiving feast

Every November, we celebrate Thanksgiving in our classroom in much the same way other classrooms around the country do: by having a Thanksgiving feast.  Today, I’d like to share with you the preparations that take place before our big celebration… Planning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool The first thing we must do when preparing for our feast is to plan our menuPlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool We must then begin to prepare our food.  We go out in search of the perfect turkeyPlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool And then we prepare the pumpkin piesPlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool Next we work on our table decorationsPlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool At our feast, we must come dressed appropriately.  No outfit would be complete without a colorful necklacePlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool And finally, once our feast has been prepared, it is time to give thanksPlanning a Thanksgiving Feast by Teach Preschool Available on Amazon Discover and Explore

Discover and Explore: Thanksgiving!

Upcoming Themes: Currently Open – Thanksgiving November 13 – Cooking with Kids November 20 – Life Skills November 27 – Gifts Please read the following guidelines for sharing:

  • Share family-friendly posts related to the weekly topic — kids activities, crafts, recipes, nature outings, printables, etc.
  • By linking up, you are giving me permission to share your post including one photo in our weekly feature post and on social media channels.
  • Visit 2-3 other posts that have linked up, find some new ideas & meet new friends!
  • If you’d like, grab a button for your post — we love to share and want to find lots of great activities to highlight for you!

The linky will remain open for one week. Then all five co-hosts will feature activities in a separate post the Friday after the linky closes. All featured posts will be shared on the Discover and Explore Pinterest Board.  (Be sure to follow so you don’t miss any features!) Thanksgiving

By | November 6th, 2013|Categories: Discover and Explore|Tags: , |4 Comments