A pinteresting Earth day globe for preschoolers

by Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. on April 17, 2013

in A DIY Globe, DIY, Earth Day Fine Motor, motor skills

I just had to use the word Pinterest in this post because this is truly an activity for preschool pinning! In our continued celebration of Earth day, the children explored a rather unique DIY globe…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

I thought I had a real globe somewhere in my stuff but after searching my house, garage, and classroom closet – there was no globe to be found. I headed over to Walmart to see if I could buy one at about 10:00 at night just to be told that they only sell globes during the holidays. So I went to plan B and painted a Styrofoam ball with blue spray paint (in the dark – in my driveway) to make my own globe . To make my globe spin, I set it on a lazy Suzie and had a perfectly simple DIY spinning globe (two of them actually) for the kids to explore…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

I am not artistic enough to actually paint symbols or shapes on the globe so I made up a set of pictures that would be familiar to the children of things we should take care of in our world and set out the pictures, pushpins, and my DIY globes on the table for the children to explore…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

And explore they did! The globes stayed spinning and the children stayed pinning all morning long. They pinned suns, fish, water, stars, flowers, and more to our globes…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

The children  loved this more than I would have predicted which is always super cool (especially after staying up much too late to get it all ready)…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

In the photo below, you will see a little girl and a spider on two of the circles. I also created a blank set of circles so the children could add their own objects to the globes. I drew the little girl and told the kids that this was a picture of me. So what did the kids do? They spent the entire morning sticking pins in me – they thought that was super funny! I heard “Look Mrs. Stewart – I just stuck you!”…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

The process of pushing the pushpins in and then taking them out of the globe was fascinating to the kids. We talked about making sure all the pushpins stayed on the tray when not in use and if one should drop on the floor to stop, drop and pick it up right away! The kids did a terrific job and all the pushpins stayed on the tray…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

For the children who wanted to make and take a globe home with them, we set out construction paper circles and the extra paper circles for a little cut and paste activity on the other side of the table…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

The children had their choice of drawing what they wanted to go on their globes or using the pictures I had made…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

Between all the writing, cutting, pinning, and gluing going on – we had LOTS of fine motor skill building happening all around…

A Pinteresting Earth Day Globe by  Teach Preschool

I have provided the Earth day circle drawings I made as a PDF – to download a copy, click here!

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

 Earth Day Fishing Game by Teach Preschool

Earth Day Activities for Kids on Pinterest

This article is being shared with you by Deborah Stewart of Teach Preschool - Sharing the wonders of early learning in action!

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1 Amy Porter April 17, 2013 at 7:20 am

“I thought I had a real globe somewhere in my stuff but after searching my house, garage, and classroom closet – there was no globe to be found. I headed over to Walmart to see if I could buy one at about 10:00 at night just to be told that they only sell globes during the holidays. So I went to plan B and painted a Styrofoam ball with blue spray paint (in the dark – in my driveway) to make my own globe”

I love that I am not the only one who has a brain wave last minute and stays up way too late trying to make it work!

This post made me smile and chuckle after a long day at the ‘office’.
Thanks so much

2 Amanda Mason April 30, 2013 at 12:03 am

I swear the best ideas I come up with are in this last minute mode! I’m glad I’m not the only one as well :)

3 Margaret@YTherapySource April 17, 2013 at 7:21 am

Another wonderful idea! Not only are the children working hard on their fine motor and visual motor skills check out all that bilateral coordination it takes to hold that “globe” steady while they push the pins in. I am amazed at how successful the children were at such a young age. Love the carry over of the open ended drawing/collage for their own world. By adding the drawing or the collage children who do not want to draw have another option. Another 5 star activity from a therapeutic perspective!

4 Pennie April 17, 2013 at 7:43 am

Pinteresting indeed!!!!! I absolutely love this. What a great way to think about all the things on Earth that we have a responsibilty to take care of. Oh and I did pin it.

5 Jen @ Daycare In Demand April 17, 2013 at 7:48 am

What a great activity! I also love that the children were allowed to use something “dangerous” like pushpins – I think they really love the responsibility and challenge of using grown-up objects, and that’s the best way to learn.

6 JDaniel4's Mom April 17, 2013 at 8:01 am

What a wonderful way to work on a globe! This can be used over and over again.

7 jean April 17, 2013 at 10:15 am

love this just cant get it to my pintrested and cant find it on yours?

8 Sharon April 17, 2013 at 10:20 am

FYI so people don’t get in trouble. In our county, even having push pins on a bulletin board the kids can’t reach is a huge violation of licensing rules and will result in a fine, if not worse. Having kids use push pins would probably give licensing a stroke. Very cute idea but….

9 Margaret@YTherapySource April 17, 2013 at 1:37 pm

Interesting. Can you say where your country is? What is so dangerous about push pins? Are children allowed to butter toast with a knife? I am not being sarcastic just curious.

10 Sharon April 17, 2013 at 3:18 pm

I agree, Deborah, but in our state if you care for children for more than 1 family you need a license. Some of their rules are important – many are because one child got hurt sometime, somewhere. They can be frustrating but your posts are so popular (and often pinned, tweeted, etc.) that I thought you should include a warning to check local laws. I know you wouldn’t want people to get in trouble or lose their license for following one of your ideas, even if we don’t agree with it.

11 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. April 17, 2013 at 6:05 pm

I actually appreciate your message and do not mean to dismiss it but please understand that I also don’t want folks to operate out of constant fear. When working with young children the list of possible things that can go wrong – like a child poking himself with scissors or swallowing glue or slipping on water or eating anything that might fall on the floor or the list goes on and on doesn’t start or stop with a pushpin and yet we have a tendency to think that if we create a “rule” that this will prevent accidents from happening when in fact it doesn’t.

What prevent accidents from happening are adults monitoring young children and teaching them to make good choices, learn from their environment, have an awareness of what to look out for, and explore under our safe watch – not to remove everything that might cause a problem. The media likes to focus on anything horrible which makes everyone afraid to give young children experiences and the job of licensing is to put rules in place that “might” prevent an accident. Although I agree that warnings might be in order, I tend to believe most adults are smart enough to know what is best for the children in their care. I certainly don’t want people going off and giving young children opportunities without being smart about it but at the same time, I feel that too much emphasis is always placed on what can go wrong rather then how to make it go right and work well. I hope this makes sense.

12 Margaret@YTherapySource April 17, 2013 at 9:45 pm

While I certainly agree with your sentiments that adults monitoring children prevents accidents there are many times accidents just happen. One of my children fell off a low wall she was walking on to have some childhood fun of practicing her balance. Although an adult was right next to her she fell and hit her head needing a suture. We can not protect our children from everything. I agree 100% that children need to be exposed and taught how to use potentially harmful materials from thumb tacks to the internet!

13 Sharon April 17, 2013 at 3:20 pm

In California, land of lawsuits and attorneys. Actually, a child swallowed a push pin that had fallen off and wall and needed surgery. It was a dangerous situation, and that has become one of the things they check now. New ones they are promoting this year include no toothpaste, sunscreen, or baby wipes accessible to children.

14 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. April 17, 2013 at 6:23 pm

Hey Sharon – but I want you to know that I genuinely appreciate you looking out for me and for others. I think you must have a heart of gold!

15 Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. April 17, 2013 at 1:42 pm

…but I have always wondered who “licensing” is exactly and why the tendency is to view young children as being completely incapable and their teachers as lacking in any ability to manage a temporary but successful process such as this is.

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