Messing around with the color brown in preschool

by Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. on January 15, 2011

in Creative Art, Painting, Reading and Writing Readiness, Sensory Play

As part of our color review week, the children tried out a little brown finger painting but instead of using brown paint, they used chocolate pudding.

After mixing up a bowl of chocolate pudding, they dipped their fingers in the pudding and began making brown pudding prints on a piece of paper…

To this point I noticed that the children were treating this process much as they would any other finger painting process. The main difference was that rather than being given a shallow container or small dab of finger paint to work with – they had a large bowl of ooey gooey chocolate material to work with.

It didn’t take long for the children to discover that they could reach into the bowl and take out as much pudding as they wanted.

The painting quickly migrated off the paper and onto the table…

The children kept adding more chocolate pudding paint which led to an even greater sensory experience…

As time went on, we had paint all over the table and dripping down the edges of the table onto the floor. So as the children played, their teacher and I began wiping up paint off the floor just to keep it from getting all over the room…

Eventually the pudding paint started thinning out which led to a new type of play. Instead of just playing with the pudding, the children began using their fingers to draw in the pudding paint….

The teacher and I both agreed that the next time we do this type of activity we would just cover the entire table with a table cloth and not worry about trying to make this into some type of “art project” they would take home. By using the entire surface of the table, the children were able to stay focused on their play and  not worry so much about trying to create some sort of picture…

Because the teacher was willing to just watch and see how things progressed naturally, the children ended up with an experience that led to color recognition, sensory play, letter and shape writing, a finger licking here and there, and lots of laughter and fun…

I am linking this post to No Time for Flashcards!

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Comments on this entry are closed.

1 jess January 15, 2011 at 10:57 am

I love this!! WHAT a mess! I bet the kids loved it and will think of chocolate pudding every time they see brown! Way to keep things exciting!

2 Deborah J. Stewart January 16, 2011 at 1:53 am

Thank you Jess:)

3 Arti Ohri January 15, 2011 at 12:27 pm

I simply have fallen for this…..What a wonderful way to get to children…A love for chocolate turned into a love for the colour BROWN…

4 Deborah J. Stewart January 16, 2011 at 1:54 am

LOL – yes it did!

5 Teacher Tom January 16, 2011 at 12:35 pm

The longer I teach preschool, the more of our art projects take place directly on the table, with paper only coming in to make prints when the children are particularly proud of their work. This looks like such fun, Deborah! And tasty too, I suppose!

6 Deborah J. Stewart January 16, 2011 at 1:18 pm

I think that is exactly what we discovered with this process – if we would have worried too much about keeping it on the paper, we would have lost much of what makes this a fun experience. Plus – and this is an important plus – I wouldn’t have been able to take as many great photos of our mess! LOL! And yes, we had lots of children licking their fingers as we sent them to the sink to wash off.

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